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New and Featured Books for 12/27/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Chinese Whiskers by Pallavi Aiyar

Political Suicide by Michael Palmer

Killer Crust: A Pizza Lovers Mystery by Chris Cavender

Fiercely frightening, yet hauntingly beautiful.

Available Dark by Elizabeth Hand

Until Thy Wrath Be Past by Åsa Larsson

Ella ella eh eh eh.

Umbrella by Will Self

The Big Four by Agatha Christie

The Intercept by Dick Wolf

Two Graves by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

16eSaramago.jpg

Raised From The Ground by José Saramago

Shadow Creek by Joy Fielding

NON-FICTION:

Trusting Calvin: How A Dog Helped Heal A Holocaust Survivor’s Heart by Sharon Peters

It's all about me-owww!

I Could Pee On This: And Other Poems By Cats by Francesco Marciuliano

We’ve been having a nice laugh reading this book around the Library. Hopefully you’ll enjoy it as much as we have.

(I almost went for the fun and was going to say that it’s a purrrrrr-fect read for the Holidays.)

Peer evaluation.

from here.

Because I Said So! – The Truth Behind The Myths, Tales & Warnings Every Generation Passes Down To Its Kids by Ken Jennings

Massage For Dummies by Steven Capellini and Michael Van Welden

Riddled With Life: Friendly Worms, Ladybug Sex, And The Parasites That Make Us Who We Are by Marlene Zuk

The destruction of slavery in the United States, 1861-1865.

Freedom National: The Destruction Of Slavery In The United States, 1861-1865 by James Oakes

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

12/12/12.

12/04/12.

11/20/12.

11/19/12.

11/01/12.

10/19/12.

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Reading material for 06/11/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

You are not special” graduation speech sparks buzz.

27 bits of wisdom from 2012 commencement addresses.

Fortunately NPR’s Car Talk will be going away soon.

Nose jobs are on the decline.

Mr. Rogers gets autotuned.

We are creating the culture of distraction.

RIP Ray Bradbury.

A video interview with Kurt Vonnegut from 1991.

Five things that Joe Hill has never done as a writer but would like to try.

10 famous authors whose lives would have made awesome books.

Natasha Trethewey is the next U.S. Poet Laureate.

A survival guide for book tours.

30 books everyone should read before turning 30.

Censoring Ray Bradbury.

500 free movies online: Great movies, classic movies, indies, noir, westerns, etc.

27 popular network shows that premiered in the summer.

25 things you didn’t know about Mad Men.

The trailer for Christopher Nolan’s Inception recreated with legos and stop motion camerawork.

Bill Murray explains his legendary fight with Chevy Chase.

Listen to a rare 1960s interview with Stanley Kubrick for The New Yorker.

The brainstorming myth.

Here are 12 bookstore cats.

Disneyworld hikes up its prices.

Neutrinos can’t beat the speed of light.

The Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop.

This Smart Bed makes itself after you get up.

The virtues of daydreaming.

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Previous online reading material:

06/04/12.

04/30/12.

04/23/12.

04/16/12.

04/09/12.

RIP Ray Bradbury.

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“My stories run up and bite me in the leg — I respond by writing down everything that goes on during the bite. When I finish, the idea lets go and runs off.”

-Ray Bradbury

We’re sad to learn that one of our favorite authors, Ray Bradbury, has passed away today. He was 91 years old, a literary classic, and an influence and inspiration to many.

We have several of his books, including his acclaimed classic, Fahrenheit 451, about a future in which they burn the printed word. No books! It’s a dark place indeed.

We hope you’ll come and check it and some of his other works out, and we’ll leave you with one last quote from the master…

“People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it. Better yet, build it. Predicting the future is much too easy, anyway. You look at the people around you, the street you stand on, the visible air you breathe, and predict more of the same. To hell with more. I want better.”

Author quotes: The needs of a society.

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When you decide to do a regular feature on your blog where you share interesting quotes from authors, well… it’s nice to work in a library when that’s the assignment you’ve set out for yourself. Because in a library there’s never a shortage of amazing stories and personalities in the library, no fear of ever running out of funny anecdotes, inspiring tales, or brilliant nuggets of wisdom.

And then when you do single out a particular author that you’d like to share the words of, it can be hard because part of the reason you picked them in the first place is that they’ve said so many wonderful things. But then again, it’s nice to be cursed with options, isn’t it?

Today’s author that I’d like to share the words of with you is Dr. Maya Angelou, the poet, memoirist, actress, director, raconteur, and civil rights activist. And rather than just a single quote, I’m going to indulge myself and treat you, and share a few…

One of my favorites:

“If a human being dreams a great dream, dares to love somebody; if a human being dares to be Martin King, or Mahatma Gandhi, or Mother Theresa, or Malcolm X; if a human being dares to be bigger than the condition into which she or he was born—it means so can you. And so you can try to stretch, stretch, stretch yourself so you can internalize, ‘Homo sum, humani nil a me alienum puto. I am a human being, nothing human can be alien to me.’ That’s one thing I’m learning.”

from Oprah Presents Master Class, featuring Dr. Maya Angelou, which aired 01/16/2011.

from here.

One of her most famous quotes:

“The needs of a society determine its ethics.”

from her first autobiography, I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, 1969. It’s often misquoted as “The needs of society determine its ethics,” which makes a little bit of a difference, but the quote in all of its context is: “The needs of a society determine its ethics, and in the Black American ghettos the hero is that man who is offered only the crumbs from his country’s table but by ingenuity and courage is able to take for himself a Lucullan feast.”

The title of Angelou’s book comes Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem, “Sympathy.”

from here.

And this is a quote I think most people need to hear:

“People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel.”

from Worth Repeating: More Than 5,000 Classic And Contemporary Quotes, edited by Bob Kelly, 2003.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Maya Angelou’s official website.

Maya Angelou’s twitter.

An oral history of Maya Angelou, via the National Visionary Leadership Project.

Angelou was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on this day last year.

An interview with Angelou in The Paris Review.

Maya Angelou’s Black History Month special.

A video of Maya Angelou reading her poem “On The Pulse Of Morning” at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton in 1993.

A conversation with Maya Angelou at age 75.

The Schomburg Center in Harlem has acquired the Maya Angelou archives.

Phenomenal Woman” by Maya Angelou.

Maya Angelou at the Academy of American Poets.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Angelou and about her life and work, including classics like I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and The Heart Of A Woman, and I’ll hope you’ll come and check them out. We also have her poetry collection, And Still I Rise, and I’m going to leave you with a stanza from the title poem from that collection…

You may write me down in history

with your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Author quotes: Burning books.

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Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. once said, “We must be careful what we pretend to be,”  which is one of my favorite quotes of all time, but Vonnegut was a highly opinionated and prolific author and essayist, and he was always a good source for a good quote or a witty turn of phrase.

The other day I got into a conversation with a few patrons not just about the need for intellectual curiosity in people, especially in this day and age, but the need for constant access to the tools that could inspire and grow that curiosity in these modern times, and it reminded me of something Vonnegut had said a few years before his death (in 2007):

“While on the subject of burning books, I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and destroyed records rather than have to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House, the Supreme Court, the Senate, the House of Representatives, or the media. The America I loved still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.

And still on the subject of books: our daily news sources, newspapers and TV, are now so craven, so unvigilant on behalf of the American people, so uninformative, that only in books do we learn what’s really going on.”

-from A Man Without A Country, his 2005 memoir/essay collection.

You can find an excerpt from the book over at The Guardian, which includes the portion the above text comes from. Much of this book, and in particular this excerpt, are very political with Vonnegut discussing his disappointment in the then-current political climate of the country. Whether you agree with Vonnegut’s politics there or not, you have to admire that there are some nuggets of common sense true for all people, and that he always maintained a strong humanistic outlook on life.

Also, on a side note, in the paragraph preceding the above quote Vonnegut references Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11, his documentary about the September 11 attacks and everything after, and reminds us that the title of the documentary is a reference/parody of Ray Bradbury’s great, classic science fiction novel, Fahrenheit 451. That novel refers to the fact that 451 degrees Fahrenheit is the combustion point, at which paper and the information on it will burn.

The gist of it is this: Not to toot our own horn (too much) but libraries curate and cultivate information, and with information comes intelligence, which is never a bad thing and always in short supply. The library is a resource that you should never let go to waste.

by Eddie Campbell, from here.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Vonnegut’s obituary in The New York Times.

15 things Vonnegut said better than anyone else ever has or will.

Venus On The Half-Shell by Philip José Farmer under the name “Kilgore Trout.”

Vonnegut’s advice for writers.

Vonnegut’s story diagrams.

Harrison Bergeron,” Vonnegut’s classic short story.

An interview with Vonnegut in The Paris Review.

2BR02B,” a 1962 short story that appeared in Vonnegut’s third collection, Bagombo Snuff Box.

The Big Trip Up Yonder,” a short story that appeared in Vonnegut’s first two collections under different names.

The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library in Indianapolis.

Dave Eggers reviews Vonnegut’s first collection of unpublished fiction.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Vonnegut and about his life and work, including When Mortals Sleep, a posthumous release of previously unpublished short fiction by the author, as well as And So It Goes – Kurt Vonnegut: A Life, a new biography of the author by Charles J. Shields, and…

Vonnegut And Hemingway: Writers At War by Lawrence Broer, which draws interesting parallels between these two literary artists, who previously might have been only been coupled together by how vastly different they were. Both were born under the spectre of hereditary insanity, forged in wartime experiences, and used their writing as a means of therapy and survival. And how much more fitting to see them linked, since Hemingway was our quoted author last week? I hope you’ll come and check them out.