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Reading material for 04/09/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet…

RIP Mike Wallace.

RIP Thomas Kinkade.

There are many health hazards lurking in your kitchen.

Men suffer from eating disorders now more than ever.

Is it a bad idea to get an extension on your taxes?

Controversy deepens over pesticides, bee collapse.

Could a nickname get you ahead?

Zombie chocolate bunnies and undead Easter eggs.

Please don’t forget that this is National Library Week! We hope to see you this week, and that you’ll celebrate with us.

Online searches for future linked to economic success.

You can now text instructions to your espresso machine.

How NASA envisioned their exploration of Mars.

Children perceive humanoid robots as emotional, moral beings.

Scientists develop ultra thin solar cells.

What ever happened to the American arcade?

Actor who could never escape their biggest roles.

New horror movie from Joss Whedon is classic horror with a twist.

The creator of The Wire is annoyed with how much you love The Wire.

Gary Ross leaves The Hunger Games franchise.

The documentary Bully has finally received a PG-13 rating.

In defense of podcasts (even if they don’t make money).

The other titles that Stanley Kubrick considered for Dr. Strangelove.

Hitchcock’s Rear Window edited into a single time lapse shot.

The 2012 Hugo Award nominees have been announced.

An interview with Jonah Lehrer about creativity.

Do people with e-book readers actually read more?

10 crazy and unusual book designs.

An archive of book designs and designers, and its blog.

David Foster Wallace writes to Don Delillo.

An interview with Ruth Rendell.

A video interview with William Gibson.

Practical writing advice from C. S. Lewis.

Odd stories behind authors’ nom de plumes.

Edgar Rice Burroughs and John Carter Of Mars.

The mystery of glow in the dark Civil War soldiers.

Take a creepy tour of an abandoned Soviet monument in Bulgaria.

6 Easter traditions you might not know.

There are a lot of cellphones in India and too few toilets.

Liquid body armor.

An important question to ask at the start of your next job interview.

Travel tips from the Harlem Globetrotters.

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Previous online reading material:

04/02/12.

03/26/12.

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

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New and Featured Books for 04/04/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Calico Joe by John Grisham

Lone Wolf by Jodi Picoult

Dorchester Terrace by Anne Perry

Stories For Nighttime And Some For The Day by Ben Loory

Death Of A Kingfisher by M. C. Beaton

The Lady Of The Rivers by Philippa Gregory

Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Richard Wright

The Invincible Iron Man: Extremis by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Adi Granov

Ex Machina: The Deluxe Edition, Book 1 by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Tony Harris

Guilty Wives by James Patterson and David Ellis

Another thriller from best selling author James Patterson (and one of his co-writers), this time about a group of women on the vacation of a lifetime that’s gone horribly wrong. You can find an interview with the author at CNN, and a rather large excerpt from the book from the author’s own website.

The Fat Years by Guanzonghong Chan

NON-FICTION:

Career Success Without A Real Job: The Career Book For People Too Smart To Work In Corporations by Ernie J. Zelinski

Drift: The Unmooring Of American Military Power by Rachel Maddow

A fascinating book about how the way we go to war has changed by the author of the popular political talk show. Maddow’s book is not really about the politics, but about ideas and facts (something that politics should treat as a little more holy), and the book features a cover blurb from FOX News’ chief, Roger Ailes, which reads as: “People who like Rachel will love the book. People who don’t will get angry, but aggressive debate is good for America. Drift is a book worth reading.” You can find an interview with the author at The Chicago Sun-Times and reviews at the Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, and at The New York Times.

Distrust That Particular Flavor by William Gibson

A very nice collection of essays, articles, and speeches from the past three decades from Gibson, the writer of science fiction and thrillers, and who has been long proclaimed as a cyber visionary. You can find some very interesting reviews of the book at Tech Crunch, Boing Boing, and on The Verge.

400 Years Of The Telescope: A Journey Of Science, Technology And Thought by Donald Goldsmith

Tension City: Inside the Presidential Debates, From Kennedy-Nixon To Obama-McCain by Jim Lehrer

Elizabeth The Queen: The Life Of A Modern Monarch by Sally Bedell Smith

The Hilliker Curse: My Pursuit Of Women by James Ellroy

The Next Decade: Where We’ve Been… And Where We’re Going by George Friedman

Looking Within: How X-Ray, CT, Ultrasound, And Other Medical Images Are Created – And How They Help Physicians Save Lives by Anthony Brinton Wolbarst

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/29/12.

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

04/03/12.

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

Reading material for 02/20/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

NASA unveils stunning models of future aircraft designs.

Take a ride in this absolutely terrifying elevator.

Tim Tebow asked to Military Ball by Louisiana airwoman.

The FBI might cut off the internet for millions of people on March 8th.

The image above is by celebrated illustrator Charles Santore.

Brand new Angry Birds game, Angry Birds: Space, to debut in March!

Target is not only extremely good at data mining, but they’re keeping an eye on you.

Man suffers heart attack at Heart Attack Grill!

Supreme Court Justice robbed by machete-wielding intruder.

Catch a glimpse of Google’s luxurious California HQ.

Apple considering a smaller tablet.

Also, Apple’s new operating system aims to knit its products together more closely.

The insidious evils of “Like” culture.

7 horrifying historical origins of famous corporate logos.

The future of high tech healthcare, and its challenges.

Reviewing Pinterest, the newest social media site.

The “Undue Weight” of Truth on Wikipedia.

Does anyone really care about online privacy?

How companies learn your secrets.

On this day in history:

In 1872 the Metropolitan Museum of Art opened in New York city.

In 1933 the 21st Amendment, which will end Prohibition in the United States, is proposed by Congress.

In 1935 Caroline Mikkelson becomes the first woman to set foot on Antarctica.

In 1962, while aboard the Mercury spacecraft entitled Friendship 7, astronaut John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.

In 1998 figure skater Tara Lipinski becomes the youngest individual gold medalist at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

In 2003 there’s an accident with the pyrotechnics display at a White Snake concert in a small club in West Warwick, Rhode Island and 100 people are killed and 200 more are seriously injured.

In 2009 the World Day of Social Justice is officially established and recognized each year. The goal of the World Day of Social Justice is to recognize the need to promote efforts to tackle issues such as poverty, exclusion, and unemployment all over the world.

Famous births: Rihanna in 1988, T. J. Slaughter in 1977, Brent Gretzky (Wayne’s little brother) in 1972, Kurt Cobain in 1967, Cindy Crawford in 1966, Anthony Stewart Head in 1954, Patty Hearst in 1954, Gordon Brown in 1951, Ivana Trump in 1949, Sandy Duncan in 1946, Mike Leigh in 1943, Sidney Poitier in 1927, Richard Matheson in 1926, Robert Altman in 1925, Gloria Vanderbilt in 1924, Ansel Adams in 1902.

Famous deaths: William Wallace Lincoln in 1862, Frederick Douglass in 1895, Max Schreck in 1936, Chester Nimitz in 1966, Dick York (the first Darrin Stephens on Bewitched) in 1992, Ferruccio Lamborghini in 1993, Gene Siskel in 1999, Sandra Dee in 2005, Hunter S. Thompson in 2005.

via Awesome People Reading.

The 20 most beautiful bookstores in the world.

Alan Moore sums up everything that is wrong with the entertainment industry.

A crossover between Doctor Who and Star Trek.

William Gibson and the way we understand cities.

Composite sketches of literary characters.

10 tips on writing from David Ogilvy.

Every Bart Simpson chalkboard quote ever.

Zora Neale Hurston’s love spells and rituals to get a man.

Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby adapted as an opera.

An essential postmodern reading list.

from here.

The cast of Game Of Thrones in normal clothes.

A supercut of television shows referencing other television shows.

Michael Bay will return to direct Transformers 4, which will be a reboot. Seriously.

Get ready for the Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Jon Hamm drops more hints about the new season of Mad Men.

10 things from the Hunger Games books that the movie(s) probably can’t pull off.

Billy Bob Thornton is making a road trip movie about his marriage to Angelina Jolie.

Gael Garcia Bernal is the Zorro of the post-apocalyptic future.

Author Kevin J. Anderson will novelize Rush’s new album.

Crystals may be possible in time as well as space.

Butterflies light the way to better thermal imaging.

The stupid things you do online (and how to fix them).

They know now at what time of day that you’re most likely to get an infection.

The inside story of climate scientists under siege.

Phonemes probably can’t reveal the ancient origins of language after all.

Do you think you could have passed Thomas Edison’s job interview test?

Cats as fonts.

Second graders take a field trip to a parking garage.

How to tie your shoes (Hint: you’ve been doing it wrong for a while now).

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Previous online reading material:

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

Reading material for 02/13/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

SeaWorld is being sued… by five of its “enslaved” killer whales.

Teens learn robotics as factories lack skilled workers.

Origami robots that run only on air.

RIP Whitney Houston.

Listen to Whitney Houston’s isolated vocal track from “How Will I Know?”

Sophisticated jewelry heist stumps Chicago cops.

Take a tour of NYC sewers on Valentine’s Day. Seriously.

California’s volcanoes to be monitored more closely.

34% of people aged 25 to 29 years old have moved back home.

The Pentagon to lift some restrictions on women in combat.

Social media explained.

Amazon tries out the brick and mortar approach.

Google might open a store too.

How to improve your odds in online dating.

The FBI file on Steve Jobs.

The man behind the fake Cormac McCarthy twitter account.

Do you want to open up a perpetual, invisible window into your gmail?

Also, men don’t read online dating profiles.

Stephen Fry says that British judges don’t understand twitter.

Arguing for a Zuckerberg tax.

Mad Men: a guide to catching up before season 5, which starts next month.

Also, Thomas Jane was almost Don Draper.

Natalie Portman to join both of Terrence Malick’s upcoming films.

Naomi Watts to play Princess Diana.

Roger Ebert says 3D is killing Hollywood.

It looks like House will be coming to an end in May with the conclusion of its 8th season.

George Lucas says Han never shot first.

Amy Adams to adapt Steven Martin’s An Object Of Beauty.

Anton Corbijn to adapt John Le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, which will star Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Navy SEALs moonlight as movie stars.

The trailer for The Bourne Legacy.

In the picture above: 15,000 different books about Abraham Lincoln arranged together to form a three story tower in the lobby of the Ford’s Theater Center for Education and Leadership.

What Dr. Seuss books were really about.

William Gibson on aging futurism.

10 of the greatest kisses in literature.

A neurodevelopmental perspective on A. A. Milne.

The top 10 Batman storylines.

Charles Dickens and Sinclair Lewis.

A list of ridiculous names in Charles Dickens novels (incomplete).

Jeffrey Zaslow, the man who wrote the recent Gabrielle Giffords book and the Chesley “Sully” Sullenberg, died on Friday.

Michael Chabon talks about his new short story.

Books that will change the way you think about love.

This is a very cool site: Better Book Titles.

from here.

How black lights work.

Legacy of nuclear drilling site in Colorado still lingers.

Entire genome of extinct human decoded from fossil.

Can bees make tupperware?

10 things you probably didn’t know about love and sex.

Metaphors trigger the visual parts of your brain.

The psychedelic cult that thrived for nearly 2000 years.

Greek protesters setting Athens aflame.

The world’s tallest hotel is, of course, in Dubai.

Why being sleepy and drunk is great for creativity.

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Previous online reading material:

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.