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RIP Maurice Sendak.

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One of our favorite children’s authors and illustrators has unfortunately passed away today. He was 83.

Sendak had an amazing respect for the minds of younger readers, often showing that children are a “tangle of vulnerability and resilience.” You can find a nice obituary of the author at The New York Times and below we have a video of Sendak talking about his career:

At the library we have quite a few books by Sendak, including many of his classics, such as In The Night Kitchen and Outside Over There, as well as Spike Jonze’s film version of his most classic work, Where The Wild Things Are.

Sendak will be missed and appreciated, and thankfully we’ll have his works forever, which we hope that you’ll come and check out.

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New and Featured DVDs for 03/15/12:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Sunset Boulevard

The Trip

2010, directed by Michael Winterbottom. A compilation film from a short British television series featuring comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalized versions of themselves, as friends and rivals, on a road trip to review restaurants in the north of England. But it’s about so much more than that. And it’s hilarious. Check out the trailer below:

And if that’s not enough for you, go to YouTube and check out the clip of Coogan and Brydon’s compete Michael Caine impressions.

Stop-Loss

The Last Starfighter

Vantage Point

To Sir, With Love

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 1

and

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2

Splice

Where The Wild Things Are

Julius Caesar

1953, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

L’Avventura

Under The Mountain

The Town

The Hidden Fortress

1958, directed by Akira Kurosawa

The first Star Wars movie, A New Hope, was based on this film as a primary influence. But beyond that, this is another great film from Kurosawa, and another great release from the Criterion Collection.

Cousins

Synecdoche, New York

2008, directed by Charlie Kaufman. This is a personal favorite of mine, and partly because of that, I can’t say too much about it. It’s not a film for everyone, mostly because it’s a very difficult movie, with a lot of meanings on a lot of levels. Phillip Seymour Hoffman gives the performance of his career as a playwright trying to capture the sadness and infinitely mundane aspects of every day life in a new work that seems to be growing more and more epic (that’s putting it lightly) with each passing moment. I know that’s a very vague plot description, and I apologize. I’ll just put it this way: This is one of the bleakest and most depressing movies I’ve ever seen in my life, but it’s also one of the best films I’ve ever seen, and one of the most uplifting. Check out Roger Ebert’s review and an interview with writer/director Charlie Kaufman.

NON-FICTION:

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall Of Jack Johnson

How Art Made The World

F For Fake

1975, directed by Orson Welles. This is the last major film by Welles, and it’s partially a documentary, focusing on the life of art forger Elmyr de Hory, and partially an essay work, dealing with the ideas of authorship and authenticity, and the value of art. This is a truly enchanting work, and for proof of that, check out the film’s introduction:

Mysteries Of The Garden Of Eden

Secret Origin: The Story Of DC Comics

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Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured DVDs:

02/14/12.

02/07/12.

12/30/11.

Previous New/Featured books:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

Reading material for 02/13/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

SeaWorld is being sued… by five of its “enslaved” killer whales.

Teens learn robotics as factories lack skilled workers.

Origami robots that run only on air.

RIP Whitney Houston.

Listen to Whitney Houston’s isolated vocal track from “How Will I Know?”

Sophisticated jewelry heist stumps Chicago cops.

Take a tour of NYC sewers on Valentine’s Day. Seriously.

California’s volcanoes to be monitored more closely.

34% of people aged 25 to 29 years old have moved back home.

The Pentagon to lift some restrictions on women in combat.

Social media explained.

Amazon tries out the brick and mortar approach.

Google might open a store too.

How to improve your odds in online dating.

The FBI file on Steve Jobs.

The man behind the fake Cormac McCarthy twitter account.

Do you want to open up a perpetual, invisible window into your gmail?

Also, men don’t read online dating profiles.

Stephen Fry says that British judges don’t understand twitter.

Arguing for a Zuckerberg tax.

Mad Men: a guide to catching up before season 5, which starts next month.

Also, Thomas Jane was almost Don Draper.

Natalie Portman to join both of Terrence Malick’s upcoming films.

Naomi Watts to play Princess Diana.

Roger Ebert says 3D is killing Hollywood.

It looks like House will be coming to an end in May with the conclusion of its 8th season.

George Lucas says Han never shot first.

Amy Adams to adapt Steven Martin’s An Object Of Beauty.

Anton Corbijn to adapt John Le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, which will star Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Navy SEALs moonlight as movie stars.

The trailer for The Bourne Legacy.

In the picture above: 15,000 different books about Abraham Lincoln arranged together to form a three story tower in the lobby of the Ford’s Theater Center for Education and Leadership.

What Dr. Seuss books were really about.

William Gibson on aging futurism.

10 of the greatest kisses in literature.

A neurodevelopmental perspective on A. A. Milne.

The top 10 Batman storylines.

Charles Dickens and Sinclair Lewis.

A list of ridiculous names in Charles Dickens novels (incomplete).

Jeffrey Zaslow, the man who wrote the recent Gabrielle Giffords book and the Chesley “Sully” Sullenberg, died on Friday.

Michael Chabon talks about his new short story.

Books that will change the way you think about love.

This is a very cool site: Better Book Titles.

from here.

How black lights work.

Legacy of nuclear drilling site in Colorado still lingers.

Entire genome of extinct human decoded from fossil.

Can bees make tupperware?

10 things you probably didn’t know about love and sex.

Metaphors trigger the visual parts of your brain.

The psychedelic cult that thrived for nearly 2000 years.

Greek protesters setting Athens aflame.

The world’s tallest hotel is, of course, in Dubai.

Why being sleepy and drunk is great for creativity.

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Previous online reading material:

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.