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New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 12/28/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

After Eli by Rebecca Rupp

Starting From Here by Lisa Jenn Bigelow

Good question.

What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton

Secrets And Lies: A Capital Girls Novel by Ella Monroe

Fragile Darkness: A Midnight Dragonfly Novel by Ellie James

I can see you!

Never Let You Go by Emma Carlson Berne

Frankenstein By Mary Shelley: A Dark Graphic Novel, adapted by Sergio A. Sierra and illustrated by Meritxell Ribas

Odd Is On Our Side by Fred Van Lente and Dean Koontz and illustrated by Queenie Chan

NON-FICTION:

How The Major Stock Indexes Work: From The Dow To The S&P 500 by Peter K. Ryan

Science experiments!

Solids, Liquids, And Gases Experiments Using Water, Air, Marbles, And More: One Hour Or Less Science Experiments by Robert Gardner

Energy Experiments Using Ice Cubes, Springs, Magnets, And More: One Hour Or Less Science Experiments by Robert Gardner

Step-By-Step Experiments In Biology by Janice Pratt Vancleave

Protect your bones and increase your tweets!

Increasing Your Tweets, Likes, And Ratings: Marketing Your Digital Business by Suzanne Weiniek

Powerful Bones: Keeping Your Skeleton Healthy by Maria DaSilva-Gordon

Health Smarts: How To Eat Right, Stay Fit, Make Positive Choices, And More by Matt Doeden

The Practical Guide To Drawing Caricatures by Peter Gray

Our world divided.

Iran And The West by Philip Steele

To die, to leave, to return.

A Game For Swallows: To Die, To Leave, To Return by Zeina Abirached

Walking On The Moon: The Amazing Apollo 11 Mission by Carl R. Green

The incredible adventures of Spirit and Opportunity.

The Mighty Mars Rovers: the Incredible Adventures Of Spirit And Opportunity by Elizabeth Rusch

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

12/27/12.

12/12/12.

12/04/12.

11/20/12.

And for Young Adults:

12/05/12.

08/17/12.

07/10/12.

04/12/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

12/22/12.

11/29/12.

11/15/12.

10/29/12.

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Reading material for 07/02/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

RIP Nora Ephron.

10 things Amazon won’t tell you.

How technology remakes language.

Does Easter Island hold the secret of reversing Alzheimer’s?

The Vice Presidents that history forgot.

What our favorite kid’s TV show characters taught us about fashion.

Science equations for the new Spider-Man movie.

The Internet vs. The NEA.

That’s Eartha Kitt reading a book about Albert Einstein, from here.

The adventures of a rare book collector.

Tom Perotta’s The Leftovers to be adapted to TV by Damon Lindelof.

Quite a few William Gaddis resources.

Your e-book reader knows quite a bit about you.

The education of a typographic innovator.

Fake books in movies that we wish we could read.

How to get children to love books.

15 famous writers on why they write.

Tyler Perry was disappointed with Prometheus and is writing his own sci fi movie.

Here are 5 characters that will not be appearing in the new Star Trek movie.

15 things you probably didn’t know about Star Trek.

Ann Curry is leaving The Today Show.

15 creators who apologized for their art and entertainment.

An interview with Wes Anderson about his new movie.

from here.

Who are the Nigerian e-mail scammers?

YouTube is developing a secret weapon to take out the worst commenters.

Nintendo has a new device.

A real storm takes out Amazon cloud, Netflix, Instagram, and Pinterest.

The fire devastation in the western United States as seen from from space.

Look at these beautiful garden houses.

Check out this stunning painting that imagines the real night sky that inspired The Starry Night.

A 4.2 million dollar home demolished for the view.

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Previous online reading material:

06/25/12.

06/18/12.

06/11/12.

06/04/12.

04/30/12.

Reading material for 06/18/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

New domain names are coming!

15 dad facts for Father’s Day.

How to make science fun.

The 50 year battle to entomb our toxic waste.

Revealed: the dirtiest things in a hotel room.

Betty White and Sarah Michelle Gellar handle a giant snake.

Twitter’s new office has skee ball.

The pictures in this post are by Guy Laramee. As you can see, he carves gorgeous landscape sculptures into old books, turning them from one form of art into another. His work is currently on display at the Expression museum in Saint-Hyacinthe, Canada, from now until August 12.

Pictures from here and here.

The many, many things that Ray Bradbury predicted.

Sadly, we missed Bloomsday, but here’s 25 writers, artists, and critics talking about James Joyce.

10 facts about James Joyce.

Neal Stephenson’s Snow Crash to be adapted into a film by the writer/director of Attack Of The Block.

10 books that were taboo for their time.

5 favorite fictional fathers.

Famous novelists talk about symbolism in their work.

The color palettes of Wes Anderson films.

20 set photos that will change the way you see these films.

An interview with Emma Stone.

Steven Spielberg was all set to direct an episode of Twin Peaks, but David Lynch wanted it for himself.

David Foster Wallace talks about David Lynch’s Dune.

Is Lionsgate already planning to remake/reboot the Twilight movies?

The best grins, grimaces, and reaction shots from this past season of Mad Men.

Take a look at this: a Bill Murray coloring book.

The Necronomicon made in pizza.

Why are traffic lights red and green?

How to tempt China’s shoppers.

June is an important month for the North American bird breeding survey.

5 misconceptions about extraterrestrial life.

The nerd weddings of Facebook’s big shots.

Seven decades of San Quentin state prison in photos.

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Previous online reading material:

06/11/12.

06/04/12.

04/30/12.

04/23/12.

04/16/12.

04/09/12.

Reading material for 03/26/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

Amazing new photos of the Titanic.

Starbucks to release their own energy drink.

Rainbow-striped Jello Easter eggs.

Mystery booms in Wisconsin.

Just how big is Wal-Mart?

What you need to know about Mad Men season 5.

A new painting by Van Gogh has been discovered.

A child’s wardrobe that actually leads to Narnia!

from here.

Retina display!

Watch all of Mass Effect 3‘s different endings.

A nice review of Angry Birds Space.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being a meme.

10 things that are smarter than you’d expect.

Historic photos of female scientists at work.

Social media will probably not democratize the world.

Play the interactive 8-bit Mad Men game.

Watch celebrities read their follower’s meanest tweets.

Young people are losing interest in cars.

Suzanne Collins is Kindle’s best selling author of all time, and 29 of the 100 most highlighted passages on the Kindle come from The Hunger Games trilogy.

Speaking of which: the film version of The Hunger Games opens huge.

Defending the thesaurus.

A previously unreleased Kurt Vonnegut novella was released last week.

How does 1Q84 stack up against Haruki Murakami’s other classic novels?

Famous lost novels.

A list of Irish heroes in Jame Joyce’s Ulysses.

Dreamily eerie Alice In Wonderland drawings.

Robert Louis Stevenson on the books that have inspired him.

via Entertainment Weekly.

A nice Game Of Thrones featurette  to get you caught up for the show’s return on April 1.

Some hilarious audience notes from a 1980s screening of David Cronenberg’s Videodrome.

Could Hawkeye from The Avengers be the world’s worst archer?

This is what Carrie looks like in The Sex And The City prequel.

They’re making a Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Meet the new companion on Doctor Who, and learn some details from the upcoming season.

An oral history of The Sopranos.

Many buyers fooled by The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo‘s DVD joke.

The beginning of the end of HBO?

A bizarre picture from a Chinese dog show.

Why cats can survive falls that would kill any other animals.

How does the brain secrete morality?

A brief guide to pop culture in 1966.

10 great songs from 1966.

Chick-Fil-A threatens the guy who made the “Eat More Kale” t-shirts, he fights back with a Kickstarter documentary.

Cell division humor.

Even Geraldo Rivera’s son is ashamed of his father’s comments, re: Trayvon Martin and hoodies.

Pictures of toddlers being best friends with their dogs.

An impossible font.

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Previous online reading material:

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

Reading material for 03/12/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

Apparently tweets can now be cited as evidence in academic papers.

The massive launch of Mass Effect 3.

RIP Jean Giraud, AKA Moebius.

Wal-Mart debuts their “Great For You” seal.

The “QWERTY Effect” is changing what words mean to us.

How do you ship a horse to the London Olympics?

The picture above is by Jan van der Veken, from here.

NASA would like you to know that the world will not end in 2012.

The youngest female self-made billionaire.

Car breaks down before Consumer Reports can even test it.

A 340 ton boulder turned work of art.

Inside some of the world’s tallest buildings.

Here’s a fascinating radio documentary: “Nuclear Power After Fukushima.”

Penguins fly first class on airplanes.

They’re going to make a movie out of the theft of Nic Cage’s prized Action Comics No.1!

by Yale Stewart, from here.

The 10,000 year plan for Amazon.

Get ready to share even more on Facebook.

Apple has announced the new iPad.

Speaking of which, are Apple’s insanely high profit margins built to last?

The Navy will be testing a new firefighting robot in 2013.

RFID your stuff, then find it with your mobile phone.

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes buys The New Republic.

Why are companies ditching Google maps?

10 of the most powerful female characters in literature.

The review of 1984 that Aldous Huxley sent to George Orwell.

The paranoia of Philip K. Dick.

Audiobooks and the celebrities who were born to read them.

There’s still quite a gender bias in book journalism.

10 essential history books written by women.

The only Game Of Thrones/Song Of Ice And Fire map you’ll ever need.

A few things that Jonathan Franzen actually likes.

The trailer for the return of Community.

Also, check out this mash up Community/The Dark Knight Rises trailer.

And speaking of The Dark Knight Rises: Action figures!

Jennifer Lawrence almost said no to The Hunger Games.

A complete guide to 2012’s TV pilots.

Apparently there’s an R-rated version of Galaxy Quest out there somewhere.

A picture of Peter Dinklage as Wolverine.

A chart that helps explain just how much of “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” does Star Wars take place.

Speaking of Star Wars: Topher Grace has edited all the prequels into one concise 85 minute long film that is supposedly fairly good.

Your first look at Johnny Depp as Tonto in Gore Verbinksi’s The Lone Ranger adaptation.

by Scott Ferguson, from here.

The many dimensions of Catherine the Great.

Kids found living in abandoned bus.

Fiona Apple reveals her new album title, and it’s 23 words long (as opposed to 90 words).

Disturbing school lunch menus.

What visions of the future do high speed rail lines provide us?

Is this the nicest Taco Bell on the planet?

A 7 year old makes an awesome Rube Goldberg machine.

This will be an interesting week, since it contains both Pi Day and the Ides of March. Beware!

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Previous online reading material:

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

Reading material for 02/27/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

The Artist takes the majority of the big awards at the Oscars.

The weirdest unsolved mysteries of World War II.

RIP Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears.

John Peel’s record collection to be digitized and displayed online.

The myth of 8 hours of sleep.

Academy Awards cupcakes.

Here’s a funny website: Photoshop Disasters.

Unlike humans, chimpanzees don’t enjoy collaborating.

Relive the 1990s in 48 pictures.

from here.

Physicist Brian Cox explains how everything in the universe is connected to everything else.

Stratospheric superbugs offer new source of power.

A pill to help you erase unwanted memories?

Studies show that Mayan civilization’s collapse related to modest rainfall reductions.

High energy workplaces can save America.

Watch TED Talks on Hulu.

This can be your next tweet.

How to remove your Google search history before Google’s new privacy policy takes effect.

A really cool t-shirt with Isaac Asimov on it.

from here.

“Everything I know about love I learned from romance novels.”

J.K. Rowling announces her first novel for adults.

Edward Albee talks about Carson McCullers.

Blink vs. Think: When a movie bewitches a writer.

Check out this NYC phone booth that was turned into a bookshelf/mini library.

Top 10 words that need to be retired from usage immediately.

Is there such a thing as buying too many books?

from here.

A 15 minute long video featuring Worf’s ideas getting shot down by everybody on Star Trek: The Next Generation.

10 science fiction/fantasy endings that we’d like to see more often.

Breaking down the Oscar nominees for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Teddy Roosevelt on The Simpsons.

A video essay on how to pull the perfect movie heist.

Oscar cynicism has become its own special form of Oscar Hype.”

The Best of the Worst Netflix reviews of Best Picture nominees.

Hans Zimmer talks about composing music for The Dark Knight Rises.

from here.

How waiters read your table.

The man with the longest name in the world.

Anatomical diagrams of Japanese monsters.

Foods for healthier teeth.

Dr. Seuss’ birthday is on Friday. Here’s 9 facts you didn’t know about the author.

Explore secret cities.

Photos of people with everything they own.

Speaking of which, apparently easily pronounced names make people more likable.

Make everything OK.

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Previous online reading material:

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

Author quotes: The needs of a society.

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When you decide to do a regular feature on your blog where you share interesting quotes from authors, well… it’s nice to work in a library when that’s the assignment you’ve set out for yourself. Because in a library there’s never a shortage of amazing stories and personalities in the library, no fear of ever running out of funny anecdotes, inspiring tales, or brilliant nuggets of wisdom.

And then when you do single out a particular author that you’d like to share the words of, it can be hard because part of the reason you picked them in the first place is that they’ve said so many wonderful things. But then again, it’s nice to be cursed with options, isn’t it?

Today’s author that I’d like to share the words of with you is Dr. Maya Angelou, the poet, memoirist, actress, director, raconteur, and civil rights activist. And rather than just a single quote, I’m going to indulge myself and treat you, and share a few…

One of my favorites:

“If a human being dreams a great dream, dares to love somebody; if a human being dares to be Martin King, or Mahatma Gandhi, or Mother Theresa, or Malcolm X; if a human being dares to be bigger than the condition into which she or he was born—it means so can you. And so you can try to stretch, stretch, stretch yourself so you can internalize, ‘Homo sum, humani nil a me alienum puto. I am a human being, nothing human can be alien to me.’ That’s one thing I’m learning.”

from Oprah Presents Master Class, featuring Dr. Maya Angelou, which aired 01/16/2011.

from here.

One of her most famous quotes:

“The needs of a society determine its ethics.”

from her first autobiography, I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, 1969. It’s often misquoted as “The needs of society determine its ethics,” which makes a little bit of a difference, but the quote in all of its context is: “The needs of a society determine its ethics, and in the Black American ghettos the hero is that man who is offered only the crumbs from his country’s table but by ingenuity and courage is able to take for himself a Lucullan feast.”

The title of Angelou’s book comes Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem, “Sympathy.”

from here.

And this is a quote I think most people need to hear:

“People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel.”

from Worth Repeating: More Than 5,000 Classic And Contemporary Quotes, edited by Bob Kelly, 2003.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Maya Angelou’s official website.

Maya Angelou’s twitter.

An oral history of Maya Angelou, via the National Visionary Leadership Project.

Angelou was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on this day last year.

An interview with Angelou in The Paris Review.

Maya Angelou’s Black History Month special.

A video of Maya Angelou reading her poem “On The Pulse Of Morning” at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton in 1993.

A conversation with Maya Angelou at age 75.

The Schomburg Center in Harlem has acquired the Maya Angelou archives.

Phenomenal Woman” by Maya Angelou.

Maya Angelou at the Academy of American Poets.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Angelou and about her life and work, including classics like I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and The Heart Of A Woman, and I’ll hope you’ll come and check them out. We also have her poetry collection, And Still I Rise, and I’m going to leave you with a stanza from the title poem from that collection…

You may write me down in history

with your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.