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Reading material for 03/05/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

RIP Davy Jones of the Monkees.

RIP Ralph McQuarrie, visionary of the Star Wars films.

A lot of fast food places are spending more money on upgrading their dining rooms.

Confessions of a bad teacher.

The pictures above from here and here.

Is antivirus software a waste of money?

Offbeat holidays you can celebrate in March.

If you’re going to dine and dash, don’t do it in a restaurant full of cops.

When you’re in trouble, call Nathan Fillion.

25 alleged Anonymous hackers were busted in an international crackdown.

The 18 types of people everyone is afraid of on Facebook.

Speaking of Facebook… this.

Windows 8 could make or break Microsoft.

The mounting minuses at Google+.

PayPal declares war on erotica.

Apple announces Product Launch on March 7, most likely for the iPad 3, right?

Google offers $1 million in “hacker bounties” for exploits against Chrome.

IBM busts record for superconducting quantum computer.

from here.

10 very weird sounding Science Fiction novels that you’ve probably never read.

Leo Tolstoy’s obsession with mortality.

Facial hair in Shakespeare.

7 children’s books written in response to other books.

An uncensored look at The Lorax and other dangerous books.

Interesting bookshelves.

William H. Gass lives in a library.

Michael Chabon has wanted to write a John Carter (of Mars) adaptation for a long time. Does the John Carter movie look good to you?

Long lost Charlotte Brontë short story to be published.

Fantastic books with disappointing endings.

from here.

Please remember to especially check back here on our blog on Wednesday, when we’ll be posting our Survey/Trivia contest.

And for info on other future contests we’ll be doing, you can always check out our CONTESTS page.

There are so many Dracula projects in the works!

Could Sherlock‘s Benedict Cumberbatch be the new Master in Doctor Who‘s 50th anniversary?

Speaking of which, Lucy Liu has been cast as Watson in CBS’ unfortunate sounding American remake of the BBC series.

And speaking of the unfortunate (and unauthorized), it sounds like the CW is basically making their version of a Hunger Games show.

The Star Wars guide to yoga.

They’re doing a prequel to Sex And The City.

Terry Gilliam’s on again, off again quixotic quest to bring make his Don Quixote film is… on again.

Analyzing and over-analyzing the new poster for Mad Men‘s upcoming season.

Andre 3000 suggests that you don’t expect the next Outkast album any time soon.

Stan Lee is a playable character in the new Amazing Spider Man video game.

Most of the cast of Downton Abbey signs on through season 5.

Operation Cornflakes: How the Allies scammed the Nazi postal service.

Taking a crack at predicting nominations for the Oscars for 2013.

Fun and interesting venn diagrams.

Bill Murray won’t do Ghostbusters 3.

The history of “Comfortably Numb,” from Pink Floyd’s The Wall.

Some of the greatest movies never made.

The new trailer for Game Of Thrones‘ upcoming season is epic.

from here.

Mars could be harvesting water from its own atmosphere.

Why don’t we read about architecture?

Warp drives may come with a killer downside.

An animated film about books that charmed the Oscars judges.

Bizarre driver’s license photo.

Watch Sherlock Holmes and the Doctor sing, “I Can Do Anything Better Than You.”

A big bust at Victoria’s Secret.

A primer on calendar reform.

This is a picture of a dog enjoying taking a bath.

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Previous online reading material:

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

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New and Featured Books for 03/01/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Tigerlily’s Orchid by Ruth Rendell

The Fear Index by Robert Harris

The new thriller from author/journalist Robert Harris, who wrote The Ghost, which was adapted into The Ghost Writer, which was directed by Roman Polanski. Check out reviews from The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Guardian, and there’s a nice interview with the author at CBS’s Author Talk.

The Secret Mistress by Mary Balogh

God’s Gift To Women by Michael Baisden

Side Jobs: Stories From The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

Djibouti by Elmore Leonard

A book about modern day pirates by the author who’s been called “The Great American Writer” by Stephen King. You can find an excerpt from Djibouti at Esquire and reviews of the novel from The New York Times and The Millions. You can check out Leonard’s blog, and also read about his admiration for Kathryn Bigelow at The Wall Street Journal.

The Death-Ray, written and illustrated by Daniel Clowes

All My Friends Are Going To Be Strangers by Larry McMurtry

In My Father’s House by E. Lynn Harris

The Wreckage by Michael Robotham

The Angel Esmerelda: Nine Stories by Don Delillo

Harlem Renaissance: Five Novels Of The 1920s, edited by Rafia Zafar

and

Harlem Renaissance: Four Novels Of The 1930s, edited by Rafia Zafar

This is a very exciting two volume set looking at classic works of fiction from an important time in literature and African American history, and featuring authors like Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, and George S. Schuyler, and others. As author Junot Diaz says in his blurb on the back of the 1920s edition, “To have all these novels in one place is the best gift any reader could ever ask for.”

Escape by Barbara Delinsky

Camouflage by Bill Pronzini

Shattered by Karen Robards

Gets off to a bit of a slow start, but another fine example of romantic suspense done right by Robards. Check out an excerpt at the author’s website.

NON-FICTION:

New Men: Manliness In Early America, edited by Thomas A. Foster

This is a very intriguing historical gender study of what it was like for men, fresh from the Old World, coming into the New World, and how the definitions of being an American Man were set, based on old prejudices, manners, and mores, through the colonial periods into the revolutionary era, and shaped by a new culture, society, economy, and political system, and factors such a racism and warfare.

Lions Of Kandahar: The Story Of A Fight Against All Odds by Rusty Bradley and Kevin Maurer

Shades Of Glory: The Negro Leagues And The Story Of African-American Baseball by Lawrence D. Hogan

The Insider’s Guide To Colleges, 2012: Students On Campus Tell You What You Really Need To Know, compiled and edited by the staff of The Yale Daily News

Cooking In Other Women’s Kitchens: Domestic Workers In The South, 1865-1960 by Rebecca Sharpless

This book has been said to show the real version of what was tamefully dramatized in The Help, and that alone makes it fascinating, beyond its being a very insightful and informative read, from what a few patrons have told me. And as one review nicely pointed out, the book is very successful in its goal to “discover how African American cooks successfully functioned within a world of extremely hard work, low wages, and omnipresent racial strife.”

A Quick Start Guide To Google Adwords: Get Your Product To The Top Of Google And Reach Your Customers by Mark Harnett

A Quick Start Guide To Cloud Computing: Moving Your Business Into The Cloud by Mark I. Williams

Burn This Book: PEN Writers Speak Out On The Power Of The Word, edited by Toni Morrison

Firebrand Of Liberty: The Story Of Two Black Regiments That Changed The Course Of The Civil War by Stephen V. Ash

The Elements Of User Experience: User-Centered Design For The Web And Beyond by Jesse James Garrett

This is the second edition of the book, a nice refinement from the first edition, and helpful in taking a lot of the simple ideas for good design that you might use on the internet and bringing to other things. Check out an interview with the author from the publisher.

Border War: Fighting Over Slavery Before The Civil War by Stanley Harrold

The Triple Agent: The Al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated The CIA by Joby Warrick

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books:

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 02/21/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler and illustrated by Maira Kalman

Daniel Handler writes fun and interesting novels for all ages, including books for adults and young adults under his own name, and the popular A Series Of Unfortunate Events books he wrote for kids under the name Lemony Snicket, and so I’m expecting his new book to be a winner. And to help promote it, he’s started The Why We Broke Up Project, which allows users to log in and share and read their own stories of romantic woe.

Pretty Bad Things by C. J. Skuse

Au Revoir, Crazy European Chick by Joe Schreiber

Cold Kiss by Amy Garvey

Virals by Kathy Reichs

Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Ultimate Spider-Man: Death Of Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Mark Bagley

Takio by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming

The Only Ones by Aaron Starmer

Never Have I Ever by Sara Shepard

Two Truths And A Lie by Sarah Shepard

Pretty Little Secrets by Sara Shepard

New books in the Pretty Little Liars and The Lying Game series.

Daughter Of Smoke And Bone by Laini Taylor

Jefferson’s Sons by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

A touching, sweet, and fascinating love story about a boy and girl who meet at a cancer patients support group, and already one of the most well reviewed novels of the year, and one of the most cherished, and before that it had been one of the most anticipated.  John Green has proved to be one of the most popular authors amongst our young adult readers, and we don’t think this book will disappoint his fans in the slightest. The book, of course, has already been optioned for a film treatment. Check out this interview the author did with The Wall Street Journal.

NON-FICTION:

Inside The Olympics by Nick Hunter

Can I See Your I.D.?: True Stories Of False Identities by Chris Barton and illustrated by Paul Hoppe

Booklist has called this book “thoroughly researched and grippingly presented,” and author Chris Barton brings you ten vignettes that are insightful and exhilarating. The stories are true, and fascinating, and presented in a way that’s easy for the reader to get into the mindset of the historical person whose masquerade and adventure is being read about. One of the subjects included is Frank Abagnale, who was a confidence man, forger, skilled impostor, and escape artist who later reformed and went on to work as a security consultant after he reformed. His autobiography, Catch Me If You Can, was later turned into a film starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Tom Hanks and directed by Steven Spielberg. You can find author Chris Barton talking about his book below:

Money And Banking (Dollars And Sense: A Guide To Financial Literacy) by Jonah Wallach and Clare Tattersall

Savings And Investments (Dollars And Sense: A Guide To Financial Literacy) by David W. Berg and Meg Green

Sojourner Truth, A Self-Made Woman by Victoria Ortiz

Black Gold: The Story Of Oil In Our Lives by Albert Marrin

Beyond Bullets: A Photo Journal Of Afghanistan by Rafal Gerszak with Dawn Hunter

Author/photojournalist Rafal Gerszak first went to Afghanistan in 2008 and spent a year embedded with an American military unit, documenting the life of U.S. soldiers in the country, seeing what they saw and experiencing what they experienced. Later, Gerszak came back to Afghanistan, with no escort, completely on his own, with the goal of documenting the daily life of the people of Afghanistan, to see what their lives are like during this wartime. This book provides not just one fascinating perspective on a country mired in conflict, but two perspectives. It’s an amazing look at war, one that is humanized, but never romanticized.

Malcom X: A Graphic Biography by Andrew Helfer and illustrated by Randy DuBurke

Into The Unknown: How Great Explorers Found Their Way By Land, Sea, and Air by Stewart Ross and illustrated by Stephen Biesty

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

02/14/11.

02/02/12.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/16/12.

01/28/12.