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Tag Archives: Sally M. Walker

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 06/18/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Biscuit In The Garden by Alyssa Satin Capucilli and illustrated by Pat Schories

Alien!

The Boy Who Cried Alien by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Brian Biggs

Amelia Bedelia’s First Vote by Herman Parish and illustrated by Lynne Avril

Someone’s Sleepy by Deborah Lee Rose and illustrated by Dan Andreasen

The Three Little Pigs And The Somewhat Bad Wolf by Mark Teague

Lily in the Library.

Library Lily by Gillian Shields and illustreated by Francesca Chessa

If All The Animals Came Inside by Eric Pinder and illustrated by Marc Brown

Hooray For Bread by Allan Ahlberg and Bruce Ingman

Spaghetti!

Tyler Makes Spaghetti! by Tyler Florence and illustrated by Craig Frazier

Giant Dance Party by Betsy Bird and illustrated by Brandon Dorman

Reading, finding, helping!

Check It Out! – Reading, Finding, Helping by Patricia Hubbell and illustrated by Nancy Speir

FICTION:

Better To Wish by Ann M. Martin

The Watcher In The Shadows by Chris Moriarty

This looks pretty epic.

Loki’s Wolves by K. L. Armstrong and M. A. Marr

Oblivion by Anthony Horowitz

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang And The Race Against Time by Frank Cottrell Boyce and ilustrated by Joe Berger

Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck by Margarita Engle

Mystery of the midnight rider!

Nancy Drew Diaries: Mystery Of The Midnight Rider by Carolyn Keene

Heroes!

The Hero’s Guide To Storming The Castle by Christopher Healy

Pi In The Sky by Wendy Mass

No Ordinary Day by Deborah Ellis

The Great Dog Disaster by Katie Davies

Below by Meg McKinlay

NON-FICTION:

Unusual Creatures: A Mostly Accurate Account Of Some of Earth’s Strangest Animals by Michael Hearst

The greatest in the world!

Harry Houdini: The Legend Of The World’s Greatest Escape Artist by Janice Weaver and illustrated by Chris Lane

Let’s Build A Playground by Michael J. Rosen, with photographs by Ellen Kelson and Jennifer Cecil

Grow Your Own Ingredients: Pasta Sauce! – A Step-By-Step Kids Gardening And Cookbook by Cassie Liversidge

Blizzard Of Glass: The Halifax Explosion Of 1917 by Sally M. Walker

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Stripes Of All Types by Susan Stockdale

Cowboy Up! – Ride The Navajo Rodeo by Nancy Bo Flood with photography by Jan Sonnenmair

Saving moon bears.

Jasper’s Story: Saving Moon Bears by Jill Robinson and Marc Bekoff and illustrated by Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

06/18/13.

06/06/13.

05/31/13.

05/28/13.

And for Young Adults:

06/05/13.

05/08/13.

04/18/13.

02/06/13.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

05/21/13.

05/06/13.

04/24/13.

03/27/13.

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New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 03/27/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

A Year In The City by Kathy Henderson and illustrated by Paul Howard

Always In Trouble by Corinne Demas and illustrated by Noah Z. Jones

Families by Ann Morris

Cool Cat by Nonny Hogrogian

Jamaica And The Substitute Teacher by Juanita Havill and illustrated by Anne Sibley O’Brien

My Brother Is Autistic by Jennifer Moore-Mallinos and illustrated by Marta Fabrega

The Bookshop Dog by Cynthia Rylant

Shibumi And The Kitemaker by Mercer Mayer

Betsy Ross by Becky White and illustrated by Megan Lloyd

Told in extreme brevity with some lovely illustrations, this is a nice retelling of the Betsy Ross myth, often rhyming, but with no evidence towards proving the tale. But that’s okay, since that may not be something you really need for the age level this book is aimed towards. All in all, a nice read for younger readers, and possibly a good spark towards conversation about the flag, the beginnings of America, and patriotism. Check out a review of the book over at The Wielded Pen.

FICTION:

Glory Be by Augusta Scattergood

This is a nice bit of historical fiction with a great protagonist. Set during 1964, firmly placed in the battle for civil rights and desegregation and change, the book has been described as “The Help for kids,” but the book really has so much more to offer a younger reader. Definitely recommended. Check out a nice interview with Augusta Scattergood at NPR, and the author’s blog.

Where I Live by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Matt Phelan

Andrew North Blows Up The World by Adam Selzer

The Story Of Mankind by Hendrik Willem Van Loon, and updated by John Merriman

Roland Wright: Future Knight by Tony Davis

NON-FICTION:

The San Francisco Earthquake by John Dudman and illustrated by Richard Scollins

About Penguins: A Guide For Children by Cathryn Sill and illustrated by John Sill

Mary Cassatt by Susan E. Meyer

Baby Mammoth Mummy: Frozen In Time! – A Prehistoric Animal’s Journey Into The 21st Century by Christopher Sloan, with photography by Francis Latreille

The prehistoric world comes into the modern world, or the “Ice Age meets the Technology Age,” as one review put it, this is definitely a good example of a fun and informative non-fiction book for the younger reader. It’s the story of a nicely preserved mammoth, discovered in Siberia 31,000 years after her birth, and the various fields of science, including radiology, palaeontology, and forensic investigation, that have allowed researchers to investigate this find.

Dogku by Andrew Clements and illustrated by Tim Bowers

Women Who Reformed Politics by Isobel V. Morin

Women In The Military by Sandra Carson Stanley

Secrets Of A Civil War Submarine: Solving The Mysteries Of The H. L. Hunley by Sally M. Walker

The Blues Singers: Ten Who Rocked The World by Julius Lester and illustrated by Lisa Cohen

Lucy Maud Montgomery: A Writer’s Life by Elizabeth MacLeod

Crocodiles & Alligators by Seymour Simon

You’re A Grand Old Flag by George M. Cohan and illustrated by Warren Kimble

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 02/28/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Max And Ruby’s First Greek Myth: Pandora’s Box by Rosemary Wells

Suppose You Meet A Dinosaur: A First Book Of Manners by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Tim Bowers

It’s probably always a good idea to be polite to a dinosaur when you meet them because, well, the consequences probably aren’t too pleasant. This is a nice book for younger readers about the necessity of manners. You can find reviews from The Busy Mom Cafe and the Youth Services Book Review.

Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King Jr. by Jean Marzollo and illustrated by J. Brian Pinkney

Freedom Song: The Story Of Henry “Box” Brown by Sally M. Walker and illustrated by Sean Qualls

Too Princessy! by Jean Reidy and illustrated by Geneviève Leloup

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer, and illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon

This is the fascinating story of William Kamkwamba, a Malawian author and inventor, who had to drop out of high school due to his family being unable to pay his tuition (a mere $80), and he began educating himself by checking out books from his village’s library. Then, in 2002, after checking out an American textbook on energy resources, he decided to build a windmill to help power the electrical devices in his home by using any spare parts or objects he could find. He then went on to build other things for his village, like a water pump to provide fresh drinking water, and solar power panels for neighboring homes. Since then he has been a recipient of the 2010 GO Ingenuity Award, which is designed to recognize inventors and artists who use innovation to help marginalized youth in developing nations. His story has appeared in many publications, including The Wall Street Journal, and he has become an internationally renowned speaker at many prestigious conferences, including TED Talks and the 2011 Google Science Fair. You can read an interview with illustrator Elizabeth Zunon on Kamkwamba’s blog.

FICTION:

After The Rain by Norma Fox Mazer

The Mermaid Summer by Mollie Hunter

Snowboard Duel by Jake Maddox

The Hero And The Crown by Robin McKinley

NON-FICTION:

Counting Coup: Becoming A Crow Chief On The Reservation And Beyond by Joseph Medicine Crow

Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince And His Orchestra by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney.

Langston Hughes: American Poet by Alice Walker and illustrated by Catherine Deeter

Ocean Hide And Seek by Jennifer Evans and illustrated by Gary R. Phillips

A Nation’s Hope: The Story Of Boxing Legend Joe Louis by Matt de la Peña and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story Of Philo Farnsworth by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Greg Couch

This is a beautifully illustrated introduction to the little known Philo Farnsworth, who created the television when he was only 13 years old. This is a great and inspiring book for younger readers who are perhaps in inventions themselves.

Jazz Age Josephine: Danger, Singer – Who’s That, Who? Why, That’s MISS Josephine Baker To You! by Jonah Winter and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

This is a very nice biography of the complicated and fascinating life of Josephine Baker, and doesn’t shy away from any aspects of her career, or even her decision to leave America. You can find some very nice reviews for the book at the School Library Journal and The Chicago Tribune.

Stand Up, Speak Out: A Book About Children’s Rights, written by and for the young people of the world

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

02/14/11.

02/02/12.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.