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New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 06/05/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Alpha And Omega: Cry Wolf, vol. 2 by Patricia Briggs, adapted by David Lawrence and illustrated by Todd Herman

Fair Game: An Alpha And Omega Novel by Patricia Briggs

Sometimes it pays to be ruthless.

Ruthless: A Pretty Little Liars Novel by Sara Shepard

Manic Pixie Dream Girl by Tom Leveen

Emily’s Dress And Other Missing Things by Kathryn Burak

The Sweet Dead Life by Joy Preble

Can the Virals survive their toughest challenge yet...

Seizure by Kathy Reichs

Truth Or Dare by Ella Monroe

The Encyclopedia Of Me by Karen Rivers

The Rithmatist by Brandon Sanderson and illustrated by Ben McSweeney

Giving to the poor.

The Outlaws Of Sherwood Street: Giving To The Poor by Peter Abrahams

The Language Inside by Holly Thompson

Take your last breath!

Ruby Redfort Take Your Last Breath by Lauren Child

Formerly Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham

The Rules For Disappearing by Ashley Elston

Fall Of Night: The Morganville Vampires by Rachel Caine

A picture is worth...

Thousand Words by Jennifer Brown

Defriended by Ruth Baron

I’m With Stupid by Geoff Herbach

Eona by Alison Goodman

The Girl With The Iron Touch by Kady Cross

And more!

The Moon And More by Sarah Dessen

Pushing the limits.

Dare You To by Katie McGarry

Night School by C. J. Daugherty

NON-FICTION:

Star Wars: The Clone Wars – Who Are The Jedi? by Glenn Dakin

A Career As A Chef by Susan Meyer

The Case Of The Flesh-Eating Bacteria by Michelle Faulk

Teen Life: Frequently Asked Questions About Texting, Sexting, And Flaming by Rebecca T. Klein

A Marked Man: The Assassination Of Malcolm X by Matt Doeden

How to turn junk into treasure.

Kid Pickers: How To Turnk Junk Into Treasure by Mike Wolfe with Lily Sprengelmeyer

Women Of The Frontier: 16 Tales Of Trailblazing Homesteaders, Entrepreneurs, And The Rabble-Rousers by Brandon Marie Miller

Ancient Treasures by Nick Hunter

Shaking The Foundation: Charles Darwin And Theory Of Evolution by Sylvia A. Johnson

Climbing Mt. Everest.

Tales From The Top Of The World: Climbing Mount Everest With Peter Athans by Sandra K. Athans

Avoiding Danger On The Hunt by Philip Wolny

How Spending And Saving Affect You by John Strazzabosco

Love Wins: For Teens by Rob Bell

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

05/31/13.

05/28/13.

05/09/13.

04/29/13.

And for Young Adults:

05/08/13.

04/18/13.

02/06/13.

12/28/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

05/21/13.

05/06/13.

04/24/13.

03/27/13.

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New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 03/06/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Goddess Of Yesterday by Caroline B. Cooney

Gyakushu! vol. 1, written and illustrated by Dan Hipp

Saint Louis Armstrong Beach by Brenda Woods

Historical fiction about how Hurricane Katrina effects an 11 year old boy, dealing with the struggles of evacuation and the strength of a people determined to survive in their city. The review from Kirkus Reviews sums it up nicely: “A small gem that sparkles with hope, resilience and the Crescent City’s unique, jazz-infused spirit.”

Hooked by Catherine Greenman

The River by Gary Paulsen

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

Flawless by Sara Shepard

Fallen by Lauren Kate

Nation by Terry Pratchett

Re-Gifters by Mike Carey and illustrated by Sonny Liew and Marc Hempel

Saving Zoë by Alyson Noël

Angry Management by Chris Crutcher

What They Found: Love On 145th Street by Walter Dean Myers

The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan

An Abundance Of Katherines by John Green

Another novel from author and vlogger, John Green, and his second book. As I’ve said before, Green is extremely popular with our young adult (and adult) readers, and it’s not hard to understand why when you read one of his books. They’re sweet, but they’re quirky and unique, and they’re smart, and the characters are memorable, especially the characters in this book, which is about a boy with an affinity for girls with the name Katherine, and his friend who accompanies him on a road trip. Check out reviews for the novel done by The Young Folks and The New York Times.

My Boyfriend Is A Monster, vol. 1: I Love Him To Pieces by Evonne Tsang and illustrated by Janina Görrissen

Great tagline: “Can love survive the zombie apocalypse?” This is a fun graphic novel. It’s boy meets girl, and of course they come from two different worlds: she’s a jock, and he’s a nerd. And then the zombie outbreak happens. It’s got horror, romance, and the art by Janina Görrissen is just wonderful. Here’s a review from The Ninja Librarian.

NON-FICTION:

Web Design For Teens by Maneesh Sethi

The Brave Escape Of Edith Wharton by Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge

A fine biography of Edith Wharton, author of books like Ethan Frome and The House Of Mirth, who was born into a priveleged, wealthy New York City family during the Gilded Age, and her escape into a more creative life. Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge‘s book is very interesting in that it focuses much more on the life of Wharton, rather than her works, which makes it very insightful for anyone who’s read her books or is looking to discover them. Check out The New York Times‘ review.

Cool Tech: Gadgets, Games, Robots, And The Digital World by Clive Gifford, with consulting by Mike Goldsmith

How Cool Is This? An Up-Close Inside Look At How Things Work

Tattoos And Secret Societies by Jason Porterfield

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone On The Media by Brooke Gladstone and illustrated by Josh Neufeld

Brooke Gladstone is a journalist and media analyst, and an expert on trends in the media, and she hosts NPR’s On The Media. She has called this book, a graphic novel illustrated by cartoonist Josh Neufeld to be a “a treatise on the relationship between us and the news media,” and the story utilizes an illustrated version of Gladstone herself taking the reader through the history of the American press. It is a very interesting book. You can find reviews at Slate and NPR, and an interview with Gladstone at Newsarama. Check out the trailer below:

Wild At Heart: The Story Of Joy Adamson, Author Of Born Free by Anne E. Neimark

Come Back To Afghanistan: A California Teenager’s Story by Said Hyder Akbar

The Big Idea Science Book: The Incredible Concepts That Show How Science Works In The World

Georgia O’Keeffe: The “Widenss And Wonder” Of Her World by Beverly Gherman

Wheels Of Change: How Women Rode The Bicycle To Freedom (With A Few Flat Tires Along The Way) by Sue Macy

Very interesting. Features a brief memoir section of author Sue Macy‘s childhood reminiscences of bicycle riding and then moves into a very informative history of the bicycle and how women were able to use it as innovative technology to cycle out of repressive conditions in the past and closer to independence. There’s also a nice foreword by Leah Missback Day, the founder of World Bicycle Relief. Check out reviews from Booklist and Read Kiddo Read.

Pre-Algebra And Algebra Smarts! by Lucille Caron and Philip M. St. Jacques

Celebrating A Quinceanera: A Latina’s 15th Birthday Celebration by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith and with photographs by Lawrence Migdale

Tricky Mindtrap Puzzles: Challenges The Way You Think & See by Detective Shadow

Raggin’ Jazzin’ Rockin’: A History Of American Musical Instrument Makers by Susan VanHecke

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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And please don’t forget to check back here tomorrow to find out more about our Survey/Trivia contest.

And for info on other future contests we’ll be doing, you can always check out our CONTESTS page.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

February is Black History Month.

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In February of 1926, historian Carter G. Woodson, the son of former slaves and the founder of the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History established Negro History Week to honor and recognize African American achievements to American history.  In 1976 the week was expanded into a month by the United States, thereby designating February to be Black History Month.  The month of February was chosen because it is the birth month of both the abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1817-1895) and President Abraham Lincoln. Woodson also founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, which is now known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

It’s important to remember that African American history isn’t about just one month, nor is it about dates and a few facts and figures. It’s a celebration, and it’s about acknowledgment and understanding of the contributions made, and about respecting that people matter. And it’s about remembering that Black History is American History, and that this is a nation of many stories, many angles and beliefs, and many colors.

Resources from the internet:

Black History Month at History.com.

African American History Month at the Library Of Congress, National Endowment For The Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institute, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

The National Endowment for the Humanities has a nice collection of resources and lesson plans for Black History Month.

Historic places in the Civil Rights movement.

The origin of Black History Month.

The history of Jim Crow.

Black History Month internet resources for kids.

Articles on Black History and Heritage Month from the Smithsonian.

Black History Month resource center from BlackState.com

A Harlem Renaiisance timeline from the Schomburg Center.

100 Famous African American men and women from the 20th century, a database of African American inventors, a timeline of black political history, and puzzles for all ages from About.com.

from here.

We would like to take this month to highlight, suggest, and remind you of the many print and electronic resources here at the library that may be of interest to anyone researching, learning, or just reacquainting themselves with African-American culture and history.

The Starry Night.

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If you’ve got a few minutes to kill and you’re in our area, stop on by and help us with our puzzle. We set this out as a collaborative project for our library patrons and we’re enjoying working on it so far, but we’d enjoy it more if you’d join us.

We’ve been wanting to put a puzzle out for a while now, something for us all to do a little bit of at a time, something that would be both rewarding and challenging…

So with that in mind we figured: Why not start with the best? So here we have The Starry Night, 1889, by post-impressionist master, Vincent Van Gogh.

You can find out more about Van Gogh through both Wikipedia and Artble and the Museum Of Modern Art, and find a gallery of his work here. And here you’ll find analysis on The Starry Night, as well as at the Musée d’Orsay.

Here’s what the puzzle is supposed to look like:

So come and help us finish it?