RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Paintings and painters

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 05/21/2013:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

If You Want To See A Whale by Julie Fogliano and illustrated by Erin E. Stead

Meow.

How To Be A Cat by Nikki McClure

What Animals Really Like by Fiona Robinson

Growing oatmeal!

Tales For Very Picky Eaters by Josh Schneider

Meet Me At The Moon by Gianna Marino

When Georgia O'Keeffe painted what she pleased.

Georgia In Hawaii: When Georgia O’Keeffe Painted What She Pleased by Amy Novesky and illustrated by Yuyi Morales

Saturday With Daddy by Dan Andreasen

Can I Bring Woolly To The Library, Ms. Reeder? by Lois G. Grambling and illustrated by Judy Love

...he probably does not taste that great.

Don’t Eat The Baby! by Amy Young

FICTION:

Killer Koalas From Outer Space And Lots Of Other Very Bad Stuff That Will Make Your Brain Explode by Andy Griffiths and illustrated by Terry Denton

Island Of Thieves by Josh Lacey

The last musketeer!

The Last Musketeer by Stuart Gibbs

NON-FICTION:

Out Of This World: All The Cool Stuff About Space You Want To Know by Clive Gifford

She Sang Promise: The Story Of Betty Mae Jumper, Seminole Tribal Leader by Jan Godown Annino and illustrated by Lisa Desimini

PresidentialPets_Final

Presidential Pets: The Weird, Wacky, Little, Big, Scary, Strange Animals That Have Lived In The White House by Julia Moberg and illustrated by Jeff Albrecht Studios

Icky facts that will test your gross-out factor.

That’s Gross! – Icky Facts That Will Test Your Gross-Out Factor by Crispin Boyer

Treasure Of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories Of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters by Donna Jo Napoli and illustrated by Christina Balit

The Ultimate Dinopedia: The Most Complete Dinosaur Reference Ever by Don Lessem and illustrated by Franco Tempesta

The edition for young readers.

How To Read Literature Like A Professor – For Kids by Thomas C. Foster

Ponies by Laura Marsh

* * *

Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

05/09/13.

04/29/13.

04/22/13.

04/17/13.

And for Young Adults:

05/08/13.

04/18/13.

02/06/13.

12/28/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

05/06/13.

04/24/13.

03/27/13.

03/04/13.

Advertisements

Upcoming library programs.

Posted on

Just a reminder…

We’ll be hosting a Beginning Genealogy discussion on Thursday, Feb. 16. The discussion will be from 6:30 to 7:30 PM in the library itself and you will need to register beforehand.

If you would like to register then please send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and put “Beginning Genealogy” in the subject line. Please register by Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 4 PM.

For more information please check out our previous post about our Beginning Genealogy session or send us an email.

Please don’t ever forget that February is Black History Month! We would like to take this month to highlight, suggest, and remind you of the many print and electronic resources here at the library that may be of interest to anyone researching, learning, or just reacquainting themselves with African-American culture and history.

We’re hoping to do several different programs during this month but we’d like to especially invite our younger patrons to come to our usual Story Time, which is every Monday at 10 AM. During every Story Time in February we’ll be learning about different African American achievements and contributions to American history.

We’d like to encourage local teens to tune in as the library celebrates the annual Teen Tech Week from March 4 to 10, 2012. We’ll be joining thousands of other libraries and schools across the country who are celebrating this year’s theme, “Geek Out @ your library.”

Teen Tech Week is a national initiative of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) aimed at teens, their parents, educators, and other concerned adults. The purpose of the initiative is quite simply to ensure that young adults are competent and ethical users of technology, especially the types offered through libraries. Teen Tech Week encourages teens to take advantage of the technology at libraries for education and recreation, and to recognize how important it is to achieve a greater digital literacy.

More details to come but we are looking to do several activities for any young adults interested in participating, plus we’re always open to suggestions or interested in anyone willing to volunteer their time.

For more information on the national initiative, check out ALA/YALSA’s website for Teen Tech Week.

Oh, and let’s not forget to mention…

Our puzzle’s coming along pretty nicely. It looks like The Starry Night is finding a few more of its stars, as it were, but we can always use more help.

Stop on by and help us out with it, when you get a chance. And keep checking back here for more information on Teen Tech Week and Beginning Genealogy and other upcoming library programs.

The Starry Night.

Posted on

If you’ve got a few minutes to kill and you’re in our area, stop on by and help us with our puzzle. We set this out as a collaborative project for our library patrons and we’re enjoying working on it so far, but we’d enjoy it more if you’d join us.

We’ve been wanting to put a puzzle out for a while now, something for us all to do a little bit of at a time, something that would be both rewarding and challenging…

So with that in mind we figured: Why not start with the best? So here we have The Starry Night, 1889, by post-impressionist master, Vincent Van Gogh.

You can find out more about Van Gogh through both Wikipedia and Artble and the Museum Of Modern Art, and find a gallery of his work here. And here you’ll find analysis on The Starry Night, as well as at the Musée d’Orsay.

Here’s what the puzzle is supposed to look like:

So come and help us finish it?