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New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 04/24/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Barnaby The Bedbug Detective by Catherine Stier and illustrated by Karen Sapp

Nora’s Chicks by Patricia MacLachlan and illustrated by Kathryn Brown

Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Are you afraid of the dark?

The Dark by Lemony Snicket and illustrated by Jon Klassen

The Apple And The Butterfly by Lela and Enzo Mari

A book about bereavement.

Missing Mommy by Rebecca Cobb

In The Tree House by Andrew Larsen and illustrated by  Dušan Petričić

Thank You Mama by Kate Banks and illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska

The Boy And The Airplane by Mark Pett

Ball!

Ball by Mary Sullivan

Bluebird by Bob Staake

Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown

A game of basketball and imagination!

H.O.R.S.E. – A Game Of Basketball And Imagination by Christopher Myers

FICTION:

Captain Awesome And The Ultimate Spelling Bee by Stan Kirby and illustrated by George O’Connor

I love the cover to this book.

Zebra Forest by Adina Rishe Gewirtz

P. K. Pinkerton And The Petrified Man by Caroline Lawrence

Horrible Harry And The Stolen Cookie by Suzy Kline and illustrated by Amy Wummer

The Sasquatch Escape by Suzanne Selfors and illustrated by Dan Santat

NON-FICTION:

The Plant Hunters: True Stories Of Their Daring Adventures To The Far Corners Of The Earth by Anita Silvey

I, too, am America!

I, Too, Am America by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Bryan Collier

Poems To Learn By Heart, edited by Caroline Kennedy with paintings by Jon J. Muth

Grandma And The Great Gourd: A Bengali Folktale, retold by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni and illustrated by Susy Pilgrim Waters

A Place For Turtles by Melissa Stewart and illustrated by Higgins Bond

Barbed wire baseball!

Barbed Wire Baseball by Marissa Moss and illustrated by Yuko Shimizu

Louisa May’s Battle: How The Civil War Led To Little Women by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Carlyn Beccia

The truth about the most dangerous creatures on Earth!

Deadly! The Truth About The Most Dangerous Creatures On Earth by Nicola Davies and illustrated by Neal Layton

Monkeys by Anne Schreiber

Shimmer & Splash: The Sparkling World Of Sea Life by Jim Arnosky

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

04/22/13.

04/17/13.

02/28/13.

02/07/13.

And for Young Adults:

04/18/13.

02/06/13.

12/28/12.

12/05/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/13.

03/04/13.

02/08/13.

12/22/12.

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New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 03/27/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Hands Off My Honey! by Jane Chapman and illustrated by Tim Warnes

One Gorilla: A Counting Book by Anthony Browne

I’m Not Reading! by Jonathan Allen

Meow!

Construction Kitties by Judy Sue Goodwin Sturges and illustrated by Shari Halpern

Love You When… by Linda Kranz

Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen

Now I’m Big by Karen Katz

Vacation!

The Big Bad Wolf Goes On Vacation by Delphine Perret

Uh-Oh, Baby! by Nancy Coffelt and illustrated by Scott Nash

The King Of Space by Jonny Duddle

The Steadfast Tin Soldier by Hans Christian Andersen, retold by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Jen Corace

Rain! by Linda Ashman and illustrated by Christian Robinson

Exclamation mark!

Exclamation Mark! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

FICTION:

Force Out by Tim Green

White Fur Flying by Patricia MacLachlan

The Witch’s Curse by Keith McGowan and illustrated by Yoko Tanaka

Stuck In The Middle (Of Middle School): A Novel In Doodles by Karen Romano Young

NON-FICTION:

Hoop Genius: How A Desperate Teacher And A Rowdy Gym Class Invented Basketball by John Coy and illustrated by Joe Morse

Nelly May Has Her Say by Cynthia DeFelice and illustrated by Henry Cole

From Cotton To T-Shirt by Robin Nelson

A poem by Langston Hughes.

Lullaby (For A Black Mother) by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Sean Qualls

Tito Puente: Mambo King by Monica Brown and illustrated by Rafael Lopez

The Eagles Are Back by Jean Craighhead George, with paintings by Wendell Minor

When Stravinsky Met Nijinsky: Two Artists, Their Ballet, And One Extraordinary Riot by Lauren Stringer

From Grass To Milk by Stacy Taus-Bolstad

The Story Behind Rubber by Barbara Somervill

Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries For Children by Jan Pinborough and illustrated by Debby Atwell

And they were funny!

The Beatles Were Fab (And They Were Funny) by Kathleen Krull & Paul Brewer and illustrated by Stacy Innerst

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

02/28/13.

02/07/13.

01/31/13.

01/02/13.

And for Young Adults:

02/06/13.

12/28/12.

12/05/12.

08/17/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/04/13.

02/08/13.

12/22/12.

11/29/12.

New and Featured Books for 03/01/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Tigerlily’s Orchid by Ruth Rendell

The Fear Index by Robert Harris

The new thriller from author/journalist Robert Harris, who wrote The Ghost, which was adapted into The Ghost Writer, which was directed by Roman Polanski. Check out reviews from The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Guardian, and there’s a nice interview with the author at CBS’s Author Talk.

The Secret Mistress by Mary Balogh

God’s Gift To Women by Michael Baisden

Side Jobs: Stories From The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

Djibouti by Elmore Leonard

A book about modern day pirates by the author who’s been called “The Great American Writer” by Stephen King. You can find an excerpt from Djibouti at Esquire and reviews of the novel from The New York Times and The Millions. You can check out Leonard’s blog, and also read about his admiration for Kathryn Bigelow at The Wall Street Journal.

The Death-Ray, written and illustrated by Daniel Clowes

All My Friends Are Going To Be Strangers by Larry McMurtry

In My Father’s House by E. Lynn Harris

The Wreckage by Michael Robotham

The Angel Esmerelda: Nine Stories by Don Delillo

Harlem Renaissance: Five Novels Of The 1920s, edited by Rafia Zafar

and

Harlem Renaissance: Four Novels Of The 1930s, edited by Rafia Zafar

This is a very exciting two volume set looking at classic works of fiction from an important time in literature and African American history, and featuring authors like Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, and George S. Schuyler, and others. As author Junot Diaz says in his blurb on the back of the 1920s edition, “To have all these novels in one place is the best gift any reader could ever ask for.”

Escape by Barbara Delinsky

Camouflage by Bill Pronzini

Shattered by Karen Robards

Gets off to a bit of a slow start, but another fine example of romantic suspense done right by Robards. Check out an excerpt at the author’s website.

NON-FICTION:

New Men: Manliness In Early America, edited by Thomas A. Foster

This is a very intriguing historical gender study of what it was like for men, fresh from the Old World, coming into the New World, and how the definitions of being an American Man were set, based on old prejudices, manners, and mores, through the colonial periods into the revolutionary era, and shaped by a new culture, society, economy, and political system, and factors such a racism and warfare.

Lions Of Kandahar: The Story Of A Fight Against All Odds by Rusty Bradley and Kevin Maurer

Shades Of Glory: The Negro Leagues And The Story Of African-American Baseball by Lawrence D. Hogan

The Insider’s Guide To Colleges, 2012: Students On Campus Tell You What You Really Need To Know, compiled and edited by the staff of The Yale Daily News

Cooking In Other Women’s Kitchens: Domestic Workers In The South, 1865-1960 by Rebecca Sharpless

This book has been said to show the real version of what was tamefully dramatized in The Help, and that alone makes it fascinating, beyond its being a very insightful and informative read, from what a few patrons have told me. And as one review nicely pointed out, the book is very successful in its goal to “discover how African American cooks successfully functioned within a world of extremely hard work, low wages, and omnipresent racial strife.”

A Quick Start Guide To Google Adwords: Get Your Product To The Top Of Google And Reach Your Customers by Mark Harnett

A Quick Start Guide To Cloud Computing: Moving Your Business Into The Cloud by Mark I. Williams

Burn This Book: PEN Writers Speak Out On The Power Of The Word, edited by Toni Morrison

Firebrand Of Liberty: The Story Of Two Black Regiments That Changed The Course Of The Civil War by Stephen V. Ash

The Elements Of User Experience: User-Centered Design For The Web And Beyond by Jesse James Garrett

This is the second edition of the book, a nice refinement from the first edition, and helpful in taking a lot of the simple ideas for good design that you might use on the internet and bringing to other things. Check out an interview with the author from the publisher.

Border War: Fighting Over Slavery Before The Civil War by Stanley Harrold

The Triple Agent: The Al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated The CIA by Joby Warrick

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books:

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 02/28/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Max And Ruby’s First Greek Myth: Pandora’s Box by Rosemary Wells

Suppose You Meet A Dinosaur: A First Book Of Manners by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Tim Bowers

It’s probably always a good idea to be polite to a dinosaur when you meet them because, well, the consequences probably aren’t too pleasant. This is a nice book for younger readers about the necessity of manners. You can find reviews from The Busy Mom Cafe and the Youth Services Book Review.

Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King Jr. by Jean Marzollo and illustrated by J. Brian Pinkney

Freedom Song: The Story Of Henry “Box” Brown by Sally M. Walker and illustrated by Sean Qualls

Too Princessy! by Jean Reidy and illustrated by Geneviève Leloup

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer, and illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon

This is the fascinating story of William Kamkwamba, a Malawian author and inventor, who had to drop out of high school due to his family being unable to pay his tuition (a mere $80), and he began educating himself by checking out books from his village’s library. Then, in 2002, after checking out an American textbook on energy resources, he decided to build a windmill to help power the electrical devices in his home by using any spare parts or objects he could find. He then went on to build other things for his village, like a water pump to provide fresh drinking water, and solar power panels for neighboring homes. Since then he has been a recipient of the 2010 GO Ingenuity Award, which is designed to recognize inventors and artists who use innovation to help marginalized youth in developing nations. His story has appeared in many publications, including The Wall Street Journal, and he has become an internationally renowned speaker at many prestigious conferences, including TED Talks and the 2011 Google Science Fair. You can read an interview with illustrator Elizabeth Zunon on Kamkwamba’s blog.

FICTION:

After The Rain by Norma Fox Mazer

The Mermaid Summer by Mollie Hunter

Snowboard Duel by Jake Maddox

The Hero And The Crown by Robin McKinley

NON-FICTION:

Counting Coup: Becoming A Crow Chief On The Reservation And Beyond by Joseph Medicine Crow

Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince And His Orchestra by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney.

Langston Hughes: American Poet by Alice Walker and illustrated by Catherine Deeter

Ocean Hide And Seek by Jennifer Evans and illustrated by Gary R. Phillips

A Nation’s Hope: The Story Of Boxing Legend Joe Louis by Matt de la Peña and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story Of Philo Farnsworth by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Greg Couch

This is a beautifully illustrated introduction to the little known Philo Farnsworth, who created the television when he was only 13 years old. This is a great and inspiring book for younger readers who are perhaps in inventions themselves.

Jazz Age Josephine: Danger, Singer – Who’s That, Who? Why, That’s MISS Josephine Baker To You! by Jonah Winter and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

This is a very nice biography of the complicated and fascinating life of Josephine Baker, and doesn’t shy away from any aspects of her career, or even her decision to leave America. You can find some very nice reviews for the book at the School Library Journal and The Chicago Tribune.

Stand Up, Speak Out: A Book About Children’s Rights, written by and for the young people of the world

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

02/14/11.

02/02/12.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 02/23/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

My Uncle Martin’s Words For America: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Niece Tells How He Made A Difference by Angela Farris Watkins and illustrated by Eric Velasquez

A wonderful memoir in pictures of MLK’s life, as told by his niece, who shares her uncle’s positive message about how there’s a place for everyone in this world, living life side by side. This is a great book for younger readers, and is very informative, and the pictures in it are very realistic and warm. Highly recommended.

Caves And Caverns by Gail Gibbons

Dinosailors by Deb Lund and illustrated by Howard Fine

Press Here by Hervé Tullet

There’s a button and they’re just daring you to touch it. How can you resist that?

Emma’s Poem: The Voice Of The Statue Of Liberty by Linda Glaser and illustrated by Claire A. Nivola

A very nice book about the life of Emma Lazarus and her famous sonnet, “The New Colossus,” which is engraved in bronze on the Statue of Liberty. You may not realize you know it, but it’s the poem that includes the words: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” This is a good read for younger readers, and especially ideal for helping them to understand what the American Dream is about.

What Color Is My World?: The Lost History Of African-American Inventors by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld and illustrated by Ben Boos and A. G. Ford

The Astonishing Secret Of Awesome Man by Michael Chabon and illustrated by Jake Parker

Peeny Butter Fudge by Toni Morrison and Slade Morrison and illustrated by Joe Cepeda

When The Shadbush Blooms by Carla Messinger with Susan Katz and illustrated by David Kanietakeron Fadden

We March by Shane W. Evans

FICTION:

How Not To Run For President by Catherine Clark

Sarah, Plain And Tall by Patricia MacLachlan

The Case Of The Deadly Desperadoes by Caroline Lawrence

How To Ditch Your Fairy by Justine Larbalestier

A very entertaining and funny novel about a word full of fairies, who are there to hinder humans doing the most mundane of tasks, and one girl’s attempt to do as the title suggests, and ditch her own personal fairy. Check out an excerpt. The paperback version’s cover, seen below, is also pretty funny, and fitting to the story.

NON-FICTION:

Black Pioneers: An Untold Story by William Loren Katz

Isaac Newton: The Scientist Who Changed Everything by Philip Steele

Twist It Up: More Than 60 Delicious Recipes From An Inspiring Young Chef by Jack Witherspoon and Lisa Witherspoon, with photographs by Sheri Giblin

This 11 year old chef has spent half his life battling leukemia, and now has his own cookbook. His story is an incredibly inspiring one, and the recipes are all extremely good and kid-friendly. You can catch a preview below as young chef Jack Witherspoon makes baked ziti:

Stokely Carmichael: The Story Of Black Power by Jacqueline Johnson

The Best Of Times: Math Strategies That Multiply by Greg Tang and illustrated by Harry Briggs

My People by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Charles R. Smith, jr.

African American Military Heroes by Jim Haskins

Tsunami! by Kimiko Kajikawa and illustrated by Ed Young

Tornadoes! by Gail Gibbons

Heart And Soul: The Story Of America And African Americans by Kadir Nelson

The Civil Rights Movement: An Interactive History Adventure by Heather Adamson

Citizen Scientists: Be A Part Of Scientific Discovery From Your Own Backyard by Loree Griffin Burns, with photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

02/14/11.

02/02/12.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/16/12.

01/28/12.