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New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 04/10/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

When Elephants Goes To A Party by Sonia Levitin and illustrated by Jeff Seaver

Me… Jane by Patrick McDonnell

A wonderful picture book about the life of young Jane Goodall, and has been rightfully so called wonderful for the young, and the young at heart. The images are soft, and very charming, and the story is very inspiring. The book won the 2012 Charlotte Zolotow award. Here’s a really nice review from a blog appropriately called Great Kids Books.

Peanut by David Lucas

While Mama Had A Quick Little Chat by Amy Reichert and illustrated by Alexandra Boiger

The Magic Bed by John Burningham

How To Get Married, By Me, The Bride and by Sally Lloyd-Jones and illustrated by Sue Heap

Lili On Stage by Rachel Isadora

Farmer’s Market by Paul Brett Johnson

Hattie The Bad by Jane Devlin and illustrated by Joe Berger

An Awesome Book! by Dallas Clayton

FICTION:

Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin

Dangerous Waters: An Adventure On Titanic by Gregory Mone

Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley

The Lily Pond by Annika Thor

Peaceweaver by Rebecca Barnhouse

Up A Road Slowly by Irene Hunt

NON-FICTION:

Wilma Unlimited: How Wilma Rudlolph Became The World’s Fastest Woman by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by David Diaz

Moon In Bear’s Eyes by Stephen A. Swinburne and illustrated by Crista Forest

Forgive Me, I Meant To Do It: False Apology Poems by Gail Carson Levine and illustrated by Matthew Cordell (pic, this one and next)

All The Water In The World by George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson

Flashy Fantastic Rain Forest Frogs by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent and illustrated by Kendahl Jan Jubb (pic, this one and next)

On The Wing: American Birds In Migration by Carol Lerner

Every Day’s A Dog’s Day: A Year In Poems by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Miki Sakamoto

Journalists Who Made History by James Satter

Bug Off!: Creepy Crawly Poems by Jane Yolen, with photography by Jason Stemple

Spotty, Stripy, Swirly: What Are Patterns? by Jane Brocket

Henry Knox: Bookseller, Soldier, Patriot by Anita Silvey and illustrated by Wendell Minor

Mrs. Harkness And The Panda by Alicia Potter and illustrated by Melissa Sweet

Can We Save The Tiger? by Martin Jenkins and illustrated by Vicky White

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

04/04/12.

03/29/12.

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

And for Young Adults:

04/03/12.

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

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New and Featured Books for 03/29/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

State Of Wonder by Ann Patchett

The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings

This is the novel that was adapted into the Oscar nominated film (the screenplay adaption won an Oscar) directed by Alexander Payne and starring George Clooney. The movie is very good, and we’d definitely recommend the book to anyone who likes funny and poignant character-driven stories, and who likes to read the book before the movie. Check out a review of the book in The New York Times, and the author’s website.

Paradise by Toni Morrison

Red Inferno: 1945 by Robert Conroy

The Fallen Angels by Bernard Cornwell and Susannah Kells

The Valcourt Heiress by Catherine Coulter

100 Bullets: The Deluxe Edition, Book 1 by Brian Azzarello and illustrated by Eduardo Risso

Like the cover blurb says, Azzarello and Risso’s long running comic book series from DC/Vertigo comics was “one of the greatest works of crime fiction in any medium,” telling some very hard-boiled pulp/noir stories in a very modern way. And this is where it began with it’s very simple initial premise: A mysterious man named Graves would visit people who had been the victim of a serious wrong and present them with evidence of who it was that was responsible for their plight. In the vein of revenge he’d then offer them a handgun and the eponymous 100 bullets, all untraceable by the police. And a lot of very interesting and very dark and very complex stories would spin out of that. Here are reviews of the series at Wired, The Comics Journal, and Pop Matters, and an interview with writer Brian Azzarello at The Onion AV Club.

The Glass Rainbow by James Lee Burke

NON-FICTION:

Women Pilots Of World War II by Jean Hascall Cole

Playing With Trains: A Passion Beyond Scale by Sam Posey

Forged: Writing In The Name Of God – Why The Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are by Bart D. Ehrman

Harriet Tubman: Myth, Memory, And History by Milton C. Sernett

Marie Antoinette by Antonia Fraser

Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell

This is a very fun and informative look at history by journalism, essayist, social commentator, and This American Life contributor Vowell, who looks at America’s imperialist desires and manifest destiny ideals at the end of the 19th century, and which lead to America annexing Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and invading Cuba and the Philippines. Vowell also talks about the culture clash as Christian missionaries swiftly moved in and tried to convert the far more laid back native Hawaiians to the American way of life. Here’s an interview with the author, and you can find interesting reviews of the book at The Los Angeles Times and in The New York Times.

And here’s an odd fun fact for you: Sarah Vowell, seen above, voiced the character Violet in Disney/Pixar’s The Incredibles.

This Is Your Brain On Music: The Science Of A Human Obsession by Daniel J. Levitin

Raw Basics: Incorporating Raw Living Foods Into Your Diet Using Easy And Delicious Recipes by Jenny Ross

The Intimate Lives Of The Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming

The Reading Promise: My Father And The Books We Shared by Alice Ozma

* * *

Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

Author quotes: Writing fiction.

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Ernest Hemingway once said, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” Here’s two more quotes from one of the greats of literature:

“You know that fiction, prose rather, is possibly the roughest trade of all in writing. You do not have the reference, the old important reference. You have the sheet of blank paper, the pencil, and the obligation to invent truer than things can be true. You have to take what is not palpable and make it completely palpable and also have it seem normal and so that it can become a part of experience of the person who reads it.”

-from a letter to Bernard Berenson on Sept. 24, 1954, published in Ernest Hemingway: Selected Letters 1917-1961 edited by Carlos Baker

and

 “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.”

-from The New York Journal-American, July 11, 1961

from here.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Do Hemingway’s works still pack a literary punch?

The Hemingway Collection at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

Hemingway the war correspondent reported from Omaha Beach on D-Day.

The five words Hemingway said that gave Marlene Dietrich a whole philosophy for her life: “Never confuse movement with action.”

The full text of Hemingway’s acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize for Literature, 1954.

The annual Hemingway look alike contest.

Rejection letters received by bestselling authors, including Ernest Hemingway.

Has the author’s death eclipsed his work?

And coming soon…

Clive Owen as Hemingway and Nicole Kidman as Martha Gellhorn, the journalist and novelist who went on to become Hemingway’s third wife, in Hemingway & Gellhorn, a movie directed by Philip Kaufman and will be appearing on HBO in May.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Hemingway and about his life and work. Come and check them out.