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New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 06/26/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

The Hermit Crab by Carter Goodrich

The Delicious Bug by Janet Perlman

What A Trip! by Arthur Yorinks and illustrated by Richard Egielski

Too Many Cooks by Margaret McNamara and illustrated by Nate Wragg

A Small Surprise by Louise Yates

The Old Woman Who Loved To Read by John Winch

The Fantastic Flying Books Of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce and illustrated by William Joyce and Joe Bluhm

Bink & Gollie: Two For One by Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee and illustrated by Tony Fucile

Food Chain by M. P. Robertson

Minette’s Feast: The Delicious Story Of Julia Child And Her Cat by Susanna Reich and illustrated by Amy Bates

My Mother’s Secret Life by Rebecca Emberley

Nico & Lola: Kindness Shared Between A Boy And A Dog by Meggan Hill with photography by Susan M. Graunke

FICTION:

Fourth Grade Rats by Jerry Spinelli

Double Fudge by Judy Blume

Superfudge by Judy Blume

Virginia Wolf by Kyo Maclear and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault

Super Stock Rookie by Will Weaver

Full Service by Will Weaver

The Sisters 8, Book 1: Annie’s Adventures by Lauren Baratz-Logstead with Greg Logsted and Jackie Logsted and illustrated by Lisa K. Weber

NON-FICTION:

Watch Me Grow! A Down-To-Earth Look At Growing Food In The City by Deborah Hodge with photographs by Brian Harris

1,001 Questions & Answers

Evolution by Linda Gamlin

Who Works Here? Police Station by Lola M. Schaefer

The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes To Knickerbocker Glory – More Than 50 Magical Recipes For Wizards And Non-Wizards Alike by Dinah Bucholz

Mark McGwire: Star Home Run Hitter by Stew Thornley

Kitchen Science by Chris Maynard

Backyard Science by Chris Maynard

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

06/14/12.

04/19/12.

04/11/12.

04/04/12.

03/29/12.

And for Young Adults:

04/12/12.

04/03/12.

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

06/21/12.

06/12/12.

06/05/12.

04/17/12.

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

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Reading material for 06/25/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

For craft lovers: fun with felt food!

The seas rise faster on the east coast than the rest of the globe.

15 robots that will change the world.

What is “the zone” anyway?

The iphone 5 may change its socket design from the preexisting models.

Watch Van Gogh’s Starry Night  as it’s recreated with 7,000 dominoes.

from here.

Chuck Palahniuk’s first novel is getting remixed.

Is the AP stylebook archaic?

A nice flowchart for keeping track of the Stephen King universe.

Kid’s book versions of R-rated movies.

What is the future of university presses?

A collection of brilliant and inspiring letters from authors to their young fans.

Aaron Sorkin deconstructs one of his own scenes to show how to write a long speech for a character.

A comprehensive map of where your favorite TV shows take place.

The Harry Potter theme played on wine glasses.

Transformers 4 will be made with less money than its predecessors.

Anna Karenina vs. Les Misérables.

TV’s all time greatest writers.

from here.

One language dies every 14 days.

10 things divorce attorneys won’t say.

Contemporary slang words that might be older than you think.

The family dog could keep your kids from getting asthma.

Ab exercises that don’t require getting on the floor.

High-speed photographs capture water balloons the moment after they pop.

Sleeping is the key to living longer.

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Previous online reading material:

06/18/12.

06/11/12.

06/04/12.

04/30/12.

04/23/12.

Reading material for 04/16/12.

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

Brangelina are now engaged.

The LAPD is using computers to predict crimes before they happen.

Kim Jong Un speaks publicly for the first time.

Which fictional character shares your birthday?

Baby found alive in morgue hours after being declared dead.

Whatever happened to the iceberg that sank the Titanic?

Very few drivers admit to being tailgaters.

The Office may get rebooted next season.

Finally, a trailer for Rian Johnson’s Looper, a film starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis as the same time traveling hitman.

Is Maggie Smith leaving Downton Abbey?

Tom Hanks to possibly star as Walt Disney in a film about the backstory on Mary Poppins.

A doctor reviews the science on House.

Kevin Costner really did ask Princess Diana to be in The Bodyguard.

For more information about this and other deadlines, see here.

Most of the pictures in this post are of “Home,” a recent sculptural art installation by a very talented artist named Miler Lagos. You can find more information about this project here and here.

J.K. Rowling’s post-Potter book for adults has a title now: The Casual Vacancy.

Bad ass contemporary American poets.

Literary classics with slang makeovers.

Antitrust regulation, price fixing, and e-books.

The 10 most frequently challenged library books.

A video of Tao Lin reading a poem of his called, “Whale,” which may be the most annoying, clever, and also annoying poem in the world.

BTW, it’s National Poetry Month!

What do you think of the smell of a used book?

Watch 10 celebrities reading famous poems aloud, including Bill Murray reading a poem called “Another Reason I Don’t Keep a Gun in the House” by Billy Collins to construction workers below…

Watch a corgi get vacuumed.

Pizza Hut introduces hot dog-stuffed crust pizza in the UK.

John Cleese on how to be creative.

How to get tax breaks by doing things in space.

Classic video games reimagined as children’s books.

A guide to finding sunglasses for lesser known face shapes.

How to blog.

from here.

Physicists continue work to abolish time as the fourth dimension of space.

Swedish town rocked by second child exorcism.

What professors earn.

What a new study of the evolution of names  reveals about China.

Scientists count Emperor Penguins from space.

New space propulsion technology could help clean up Earth orbit.

Star making in France.

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Previous online reading material:

04/09/12.

04/02/12.

03/26/12.

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

New and Featured DVDs for 03/15/12:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Sunset Boulevard

The Trip

2010, directed by Michael Winterbottom. A compilation film from a short British television series featuring comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalized versions of themselves, as friends and rivals, on a road trip to review restaurants in the north of England. But it’s about so much more than that. And it’s hilarious. Check out the trailer below:

And if that’s not enough for you, go to YouTube and check out the clip of Coogan and Brydon’s compete Michael Caine impressions.

Stop-Loss

The Last Starfighter

Vantage Point

To Sir, With Love

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 1

and

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2

Splice

Where The Wild Things Are

Julius Caesar

1953, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

L’Avventura

Under The Mountain

The Town

The Hidden Fortress

1958, directed by Akira Kurosawa

The first Star Wars movie, A New Hope, was based on this film as a primary influence. But beyond that, this is another great film from Kurosawa, and another great release from the Criterion Collection.

Cousins

Synecdoche, New York

2008, directed by Charlie Kaufman. This is a personal favorite of mine, and partly because of that, I can’t say too much about it. It’s not a film for everyone, mostly because it’s a very difficult movie, with a lot of meanings on a lot of levels. Phillip Seymour Hoffman gives the performance of his career as a playwright trying to capture the sadness and infinitely mundane aspects of every day life in a new work that seems to be growing more and more epic (that’s putting it lightly) with each passing moment. I know that’s a very vague plot description, and I apologize. I’ll just put it this way: This is one of the bleakest and most depressing movies I’ve ever seen in my life, but it’s also one of the best films I’ve ever seen, and one of the most uplifting. Check out Roger Ebert’s review and an interview with writer/director Charlie Kaufman.

NON-FICTION:

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall Of Jack Johnson

How Art Made The World

F For Fake

1975, directed by Orson Welles. This is the last major film by Welles, and it’s partially a documentary, focusing on the life of art forger Elmyr de Hory, and partially an essay work, dealing with the ideas of authorship and authenticity, and the value of art. This is a truly enchanting work, and for proof of that, check out the film’s introduction:

Mysteries Of The Garden Of Eden

Secret Origin: The Story Of DC Comics

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Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured DVDs:

02/14/12.

02/07/12.

12/30/11.

Previous New/Featured books:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

Reading material for 03/12/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

Apparently tweets can now be cited as evidence in academic papers.

The massive launch of Mass Effect 3.

RIP Jean Giraud, AKA Moebius.

Wal-Mart debuts their “Great For You” seal.

The “QWERTY Effect” is changing what words mean to us.

How do you ship a horse to the London Olympics?

The picture above is by Jan van der Veken, from here.

NASA would like you to know that the world will not end in 2012.

The youngest female self-made billionaire.

Car breaks down before Consumer Reports can even test it.

A 340 ton boulder turned work of art.

Inside some of the world’s tallest buildings.

Here’s a fascinating radio documentary: “Nuclear Power After Fukushima.”

Penguins fly first class on airplanes.

They’re going to make a movie out of the theft of Nic Cage’s prized Action Comics No.1!

by Yale Stewart, from here.

The 10,000 year plan for Amazon.

Get ready to share even more on Facebook.

Apple has announced the new iPad.

Speaking of which, are Apple’s insanely high profit margins built to last?

The Navy will be testing a new firefighting robot in 2013.

RFID your stuff, then find it with your mobile phone.

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes buys The New Republic.

Why are companies ditching Google maps?

10 of the most powerful female characters in literature.

The review of 1984 that Aldous Huxley sent to George Orwell.

The paranoia of Philip K. Dick.

Audiobooks and the celebrities who were born to read them.

There’s still quite a gender bias in book journalism.

10 essential history books written by women.

The only Game Of Thrones/Song Of Ice And Fire map you’ll ever need.

A few things that Jonathan Franzen actually likes.

The trailer for the return of Community.

Also, check out this mash up Community/The Dark Knight Rises trailer.

And speaking of The Dark Knight Rises: Action figures!

Jennifer Lawrence almost said no to The Hunger Games.

A complete guide to 2012’s TV pilots.

Apparently there’s an R-rated version of Galaxy Quest out there somewhere.

A picture of Peter Dinklage as Wolverine.

A chart that helps explain just how much of “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” does Star Wars take place.

Speaking of Star Wars: Topher Grace has edited all the prequels into one concise 85 minute long film that is supposedly fairly good.

Your first look at Johnny Depp as Tonto in Gore Verbinksi’s The Lone Ranger adaptation.

by Scott Ferguson, from here.

The many dimensions of Catherine the Great.

Kids found living in abandoned bus.

Fiona Apple reveals her new album title, and it’s 23 words long (as opposed to 90 words).

Disturbing school lunch menus.

What visions of the future do high speed rail lines provide us?

Is this the nicest Taco Bell on the planet?

A 7 year old makes an awesome Rube Goldberg machine.

This will be an interesting week, since it contains both Pi Day and the Ides of March. Beware!

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Previous online reading material:

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

Reading material for 02/27/12:

Posted on

from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

The Artist takes the majority of the big awards at the Oscars.

The weirdest unsolved mysteries of World War II.

RIP Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears.

John Peel’s record collection to be digitized and displayed online.

The myth of 8 hours of sleep.

Academy Awards cupcakes.

Here’s a funny website: Photoshop Disasters.

Unlike humans, chimpanzees don’t enjoy collaborating.

Relive the 1990s in 48 pictures.

from here.

Physicist Brian Cox explains how everything in the universe is connected to everything else.

Stratospheric superbugs offer new source of power.

A pill to help you erase unwanted memories?

Studies show that Mayan civilization’s collapse related to modest rainfall reductions.

High energy workplaces can save America.

Watch TED Talks on Hulu.

This can be your next tweet.

How to remove your Google search history before Google’s new privacy policy takes effect.

A really cool t-shirt with Isaac Asimov on it.

from here.

“Everything I know about love I learned from romance novels.”

J.K. Rowling announces her first novel for adults.

Edward Albee talks about Carson McCullers.

Blink vs. Think: When a movie bewitches a writer.

Check out this NYC phone booth that was turned into a bookshelf/mini library.

Top 10 words that need to be retired from usage immediately.

Is there such a thing as buying too many books?

from here.

A 15 minute long video featuring Worf’s ideas getting shot down by everybody on Star Trek: The Next Generation.

10 science fiction/fantasy endings that we’d like to see more often.

Breaking down the Oscar nominees for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Teddy Roosevelt on The Simpsons.

A video essay on how to pull the perfect movie heist.

Oscar cynicism has become its own special form of Oscar Hype.”

The Best of the Worst Netflix reviews of Best Picture nominees.

Hans Zimmer talks about composing music for The Dark Knight Rises.

from here.

How waiters read your table.

The man with the longest name in the world.

Anatomical diagrams of Japanese monsters.

Foods for healthier teeth.

Dr. Seuss’ birthday is on Friday. Here’s 9 facts you didn’t know about the author.

Explore secret cities.

Photos of people with everything they own.

Speaking of which, apparently easily pronounced names make people more likable.

Make everything OK.

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Previous online reading material:

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

New and Featured Books for 12/19/11:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Mrs. Jeffries And The Mistletoe Mix-Up by Emily Brightwell

While Mortals Sleep: Unpublished Short Fiction by Kurt Vonnegut

The Fifth Woman by Henning Mankell

A Discovery Of Witches by Deborah Harkness

The Unwritten, vol. 1: Tommy Taylor And The Bogus Identity by Mike Carey and illustrated by Peter Gross

The Magician King by Lev Grossman

The Evolution Of Bruno Littlemore by Benjamin Hale

Tricked, written and illustrated by Alex Robinson

NON-FICTION:

In The Womb by Peter Tallack

Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life Of Walter Payton by Jeff Pearlman

America The Vulnerable: Inside The New Threat Matrix Of Digital Espionage, Crime, And Warfare by Joel Brenner

And So It Goes – Kurt Vonnegut: A Life by Charles J. Shields

The New Supply Chain Agenda by Reuben E. Slone

Lost In Shangri-La: A True Story Of Survival, Adventure, And The Most Incredible Rescue Mission Of World War II by Mitchell Zuckoff

A fascinating true story based on the crash of a US military plane called The Gremlin Special. The term “Shangri-La” is the name of a fictional utopia and comes from James Hilton’s Lost Horizon. This book has been listed as amongst the best non-fiction of 2011 by both Salon magazine and The New York Times. We have the American hardcover edition of the book, the cover of which you can see above, but I think I much prefer the British edition’s cover:

Margaret Mitchell, Reporter, edited by Patrick Allen

Clark Howard’s Living Large In Lean Times: 250+ Ways To Buy Smarter, Spend Smarter, and Save Money by Clark Howard

Colossus: Hoover Dam And The Making Of The American Century by Michael Hiltzik

Black Power In Dixie: A Political History Of African Americans In Atlanta by Alton Hornsby Jr.

Dreaming Of Dixie: How The South Was Created In American Popular Culture by Karen L. Cox

You can watch an interview with the author here, via BookTV.

How I Got This Way by Regis Philbin

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books:

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

12/15/11.