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New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 10/24/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Falling out.

Fallout by Todd Strasser

Shadows by Ilsa J. Bick

Monsters by Ilsa J. Bick

Slated by Teri Terry

Revealed by P. C. Cast and Kristin Cast

Princesses love chess.

The Princess Of Cortova by Diane Stanley

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson

A superhero for a new generation.

Battling Boy by Paul Pope

Lara’s Gift by Annemarie O’Brien

Time After Time by Tamara Ireland Stone

Die young, stay hungry.

Undead by Kirsty McKay

The Murders In The Rue Morgue And Other Tales by Edgar Allan Poe, adapted by Jean David Morvan and Corbeyran and illustrated by Fabrice Druet and Paul Marcel

Dead Girls Don’t Lie by Jennifer Shaw Wolf

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare, adapted and illustrated by Hyekyung Baek

A novel in verse.

Serefina’s Promise: A Novel In Verse by Ann E. Burg

Myths and heroes.

Insurgent by Veronica Roth

Allegiant by Veronica Roth

The House Of Hades by Rick Riordan

Percy Jackson & The Olympians: The Titan’s Curse by Rick Riordan, adapted by Robert Venditti, and illustrated by Attila Futaki

Still Star-Crossed by Melinda Taub

NON-FICTION:

A Bag Of Marbles by Joseph Joffo, adapted by Kris and illustrated by Vincent Bailly, translated by Edward Gauvin

Healthy Weight For Teens by Carla Mooney

Punctuation And Spelling: Rules That Make Things Clear by Rebecca Vickers

Giants of science!

Benjamin Franklin by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Boris Kulikov

Pioneering American Computer Geniuses by Mary Northrup

Amazing American Inventors Of The 20th Century by Laura S. Jeffrey

Internship & Volunteer Opportunities For People Who Love Animals by Ann Byers

Extreme Physics by Dan Green

The man who could not stop drawing.

Randolph Caldecott: The Man Who Could Not Stop Drawing by Leonard S. Marcus

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

10/23/13.

10/21/13.

10/18/13.

09/25/13.

And for Young Adults:

10/22/13.

09/06/13.

07/15/13.

06/28/13.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

06/19/13.

06/18/13.

05/21/13.

05/06/13.

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Author quotes: Discrimination, discovery, and freedom.

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As I said last week, when you’ve set out to share great quotes from wonderful authors with the world, then it’s nice to be doing so from a library, where there is never a shortage of such unique and talented voices, with such wisdom to share. And today I didn’t want to limit myself to just one voice, so today we are going to hear from three of American literature’s finest…

First we have a nice perspective from one of the writers at the center of the Harlem Renaissance:

“Sometimes I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It is beyond me.”

-Zora Neale Hurston, from “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” an essay which appeared in The World Tomorrow in May, 1928.

Next we have a quote from a novel that not only changed what people could expect from an African American protagonist, but also from an African American novelist:

“When I discover who I am, I’ll be free.”

-Ralph Ellison, from his famous 1952 novel, Invisible Man, which won the National Book Award in 1953.

Our last quote for today comes from a writer who only wrote one novel in her lifetime, but it was an amazing novel:

“I think there’s just one kind of folks: folks.”

-Harper Lee, from her famous novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, 1960. Lee is, of course, pictured above, with her friend, Truman Capote, her childhood schoolmate, neighbor, and best friend.

Elsewhere on the internet:

It’s important to note that both Invisible Man and To Kill A Mockingbird are on The Modern Library’s list of 100 Best Novels, a nice list of the best novels written in the English language in the twentieth century.

It’s also important to note that Invisible Man, To Kill A Mockingbird, and Their Eyes Were Watching God are all on Time magazine’s list of the 100 Best English-Language Novels from 1923 to 2005.

The New York Times’ review of Invisible Man.

Saul Bellow’s review of Invisible Man.

A podcast about Ralph Ellison, and how his works are still being taught today, from Voices Of America.

An interview with Ralph Ellison in The Paris Review.

To Kill A Mockingbird: A historical perspective.

Harper Lee was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007.

To Kill A Mockingbird was named the UK’s most beloved book last year.

The mystery of Harper Lee.

Harper Lee made a rare written appearance in 2006, writing an open letter to Oprah Winfrey in O magazine.

The official website of Zora Neale Hurston.

Study guides for Their Eyes Were Watching God at both Grade Saver and Shmoop.

An interview with Zora Neale Hurston about her research into actual zombies in Haiti.

An in depth biography of Zora Neale Hurston from Gale.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, and Harper Lee, and about them. To Kill A Mockingbird and Their Eyes Were Watching God are always popular, partially because students get assignments involving them every year, so I’m glad that we have those books, as well as quite a few volumes of literary criticism about their authors, but I wish more people would come in asking about Ralph Ellison. Either way, there’s a reason that all three of these authors and their works are considered classics and I hope you’ll come and check them out.