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Tag Archives: El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 06/05/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Alpha And Omega: Cry Wolf, vol. 2 by Patricia Briggs, adapted by David Lawrence and illustrated by Todd Herman

Fair Game: An Alpha And Omega Novel by Patricia Briggs

Sometimes it pays to be ruthless.

Ruthless: A Pretty Little Liars Novel by Sara Shepard

Manic Pixie Dream Girl by Tom Leveen

Emily’s Dress And Other Missing Things by Kathryn Burak

The Sweet Dead Life by Joy Preble

Can the Virals survive their toughest challenge yet...

Seizure by Kathy Reichs

Truth Or Dare by Ella Monroe

The Encyclopedia Of Me by Karen Rivers

The Rithmatist by Brandon Sanderson and illustrated by Ben McSweeney

Giving to the poor.

The Outlaws Of Sherwood Street: Giving To The Poor by Peter Abrahams

The Language Inside by Holly Thompson

Take your last breath!

Ruby Redfort Take Your Last Breath by Lauren Child

Formerly Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham

The Rules For Disappearing by Ashley Elston

Fall Of Night: The Morganville Vampires by Rachel Caine

A picture is worth...

Thousand Words by Jennifer Brown

Defriended by Ruth Baron

I’m With Stupid by Geoff Herbach

Eona by Alison Goodman

The Girl With The Iron Touch by Kady Cross

And more!

The Moon And More by Sarah Dessen

Pushing the limits.

Dare You To by Katie McGarry

Night School by C. J. Daugherty

NON-FICTION:

Star Wars: The Clone Wars – Who Are The Jedi? by Glenn Dakin

A Career As A Chef by Susan Meyer

The Case Of The Flesh-Eating Bacteria by Michelle Faulk

Teen Life: Frequently Asked Questions About Texting, Sexting, And Flaming by Rebecca T. Klein

A Marked Man: The Assassination Of Malcolm X by Matt Doeden

How to turn junk into treasure.

Kid Pickers: How To Turnk Junk Into Treasure by Mike Wolfe with Lily Sprengelmeyer

Women Of The Frontier: 16 Tales Of Trailblazing Homesteaders, Entrepreneurs, And The Rabble-Rousers by Brandon Marie Miller

Ancient Treasures by Nick Hunter

Shaking The Foundation: Charles Darwin And Theory Of Evolution by Sylvia A. Johnson

Climbing Mt. Everest.

Tales From The Top Of The World: Climbing Mount Everest With Peter Athans by Sandra K. Athans

Avoiding Danger On The Hunt by Philip Wolny

How Spending And Saving Affect You by John Strazzabosco

Love Wins: For Teens by Rob Bell

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

05/31/13.

05/28/13.

05/09/13.

04/29/13.

And for Young Adults:

05/08/13.

04/18/13.

02/06/13.

12/28/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

05/21/13.

05/06/13.

04/24/13.

03/27/13.

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Author quotes: The needs of a society.

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When you decide to do a regular feature on your blog where you share interesting quotes from authors, well… it’s nice to work in a library when that’s the assignment you’ve set out for yourself. Because in a library there’s never a shortage of amazing stories and personalities in the library, no fear of ever running out of funny anecdotes, inspiring tales, or brilliant nuggets of wisdom.

And then when you do single out a particular author that you’d like to share the words of, it can be hard because part of the reason you picked them in the first place is that they’ve said so many wonderful things. But then again, it’s nice to be cursed with options, isn’t it?

Today’s author that I’d like to share the words of with you is Dr. Maya Angelou, the poet, memoirist, actress, director, raconteur, and civil rights activist. And rather than just a single quote, I’m going to indulge myself and treat you, and share a few…

One of my favorites:

“If a human being dreams a great dream, dares to love somebody; if a human being dares to be Martin King, or Mahatma Gandhi, or Mother Theresa, or Malcolm X; if a human being dares to be bigger than the condition into which she or he was born—it means so can you. And so you can try to stretch, stretch, stretch yourself so you can internalize, ‘Homo sum, humani nil a me alienum puto. I am a human being, nothing human can be alien to me.’ That’s one thing I’m learning.”

from Oprah Presents Master Class, featuring Dr. Maya Angelou, which aired 01/16/2011.

from here.

One of her most famous quotes:

“The needs of a society determine its ethics.”

from her first autobiography, I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, 1969. It’s often misquoted as “The needs of society determine its ethics,” which makes a little bit of a difference, but the quote in all of its context is: “The needs of a society determine its ethics, and in the Black American ghettos the hero is that man who is offered only the crumbs from his country’s table but by ingenuity and courage is able to take for himself a Lucullan feast.”

The title of Angelou’s book comes Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem, “Sympathy.”

from here.

And this is a quote I think most people need to hear:

“People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel.”

from Worth Repeating: More Than 5,000 Classic And Contemporary Quotes, edited by Bob Kelly, 2003.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Maya Angelou’s official website.

Maya Angelou’s twitter.

An oral history of Maya Angelou, via the National Visionary Leadership Project.

Angelou was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on this day last year.

An interview with Angelou in The Paris Review.

Maya Angelou’s Black History Month special.

A video of Maya Angelou reading her poem “On The Pulse Of Morning” at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton in 1993.

A conversation with Maya Angelou at age 75.

The Schomburg Center in Harlem has acquired the Maya Angelou archives.

Phenomenal Woman” by Maya Angelou.

Maya Angelou at the Academy of American Poets.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Angelou and about her life and work, including classics like I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and The Heart Of A Woman, and I’ll hope you’ll come and check them out. We also have her poetry collection, And Still I Rise, and I’m going to leave you with a stanza from the title poem from that collection…

You may write me down in history

with your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.