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New and Featured DVDs for 12/17/13:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Flight

War Horse

Midnight In Paris

The Ice Storm

Creature From The Black Lagoon

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

...and by each crime and every kindness we birth our future.

Cloud Atlas

Sherlock, season 2

Howl’s Moving Castle

Pain & Gain

The Neverending Story

The Stepford Wives

Oblivion

Certified Copy

The closer you look, the less you will see.

Now You See Me

The Squid And The Whale

Django Unchained

Ted

The Flowers Of War

The Shining

They are taking adventure to new lengths...

Tangled

The Black Hole

It

Take Shelter

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol

Side Effects

Rango

Downton Abbey, season 3

Godzilla

Hereafter

No one cared who I was until I put on the mask...

The Dark Knight Rises

The Rock

My Fair Lady

Tiny Furniture

Identity Thief

NON-FICTION:

Afraid Of The Dark

The Creation Of The Computer

A film by Sarah Polley.

Stories We Tell

Thomas Jefferson

Jesse James

Brain Games

Jesus Camp

The 500 year legacy that shaped a nation.

Latino Americans

Houdini

Herod’s Lost Tomb

A Martin Scorsese picture.

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

Yoga For Beginners With Desi Bartlett

Yoga For Weight Loss

Dance Off The Inches: Hip Hop Party

10 Minute Solution: Fat Blasting Dance Mix

Secrets Of Body Language

The Science Of Sex Appeal

The future is now!

What Will The Future Be Like?

The Fabric Of The Cosmos

The Medal Of Honor: The Stories Of Our Nation’s Most Celebrated Heroes

Wyatt Earp

Wanted: Billy The Kid, Dead Or Alive

Guns: The Evolution Of Firearms

Creativity can solve anything.

Art & Copy

Harlan Ellison: Dreams With Sharp Teeth

Bully

A Place At The Table

Mythbusters, Collection 2

American Teacher

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Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured DVDs:

10/31/13.

10/24/13.

10/05/12.

06/28/12.

Previous New/Featured books:

11/12/2013.

10/25/13.

10/23/13.

10/21/13.

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New and Featured Books for 10/18/2013:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

The Night Is Forever by Heather Graham

Gold and babies.

The Pure Gold Baby by Margaret Drabble

Starry Night by Debbie Macomber

Three Can Keep A Secret by Archer Mayor

Inherit The Dead by various authors

Robert B. Parker’s Damned If You Do by Michael Brandman

Yeah, seriously. Who?

Who Asked You? by Terry McMillan

Secrets Of The Notebook by Eve Haas

Star Wars: Kenobi by John Jackson Miller

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

Deadline by Sandra Brown

Will the circle remain unbroken?

The Circle by Dave Eggers

Loss Of Innocence by Richard North Patterson

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

The Double by George Pelecanos

Death Over Easy by Toby Speed

The night guest!

The Night Guest by Fiona McFarlane

Ghost Gone Wild by Carolyn Hart

Doing Hard Time by Stuart Woods

NON-FICTION:

The sense of an ending.

Levels Of Life by Julian Barnes

My Story by Elizabeth Smart with Christ Stewart

Gaddafi’s Harem: The Story Of A Young Woman And The Abuses Of Power In Libya by Annick Cojean

When politics worked.

Tip And The Gipper: When Politics Worked by Chris Matthews

There’s More To Life Than This: Healing Messages, Remarkable Stories, And Insight About The Other Side From The Long Island Medium by Theresa Caputo

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

09/25/13.

09/18/13.

09/03/13.

08/14/13.

08/06/13.

RIP Maurice Sendak.

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One of our favorite children’s authors and illustrators has unfortunately passed away today. He was 83.

Sendak had an amazing respect for the minds of younger readers, often showing that children are a “tangle of vulnerability and resilience.” You can find a nice obituary of the author at The New York Times and below we have a video of Sendak talking about his career:

At the library we have quite a few books by Sendak, including many of his classics, such as In The Night Kitchen and Outside Over There, as well as Spike Jonze’s film version of his most classic work, Where The Wild Things Are.

Sendak will be missed and appreciated, and thankfully we’ll have his works forever, which we hope that you’ll come and check out.

New and Featured DVDs for 03/15/12:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Sunset Boulevard

The Trip

2010, directed by Michael Winterbottom. A compilation film from a short British television series featuring comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalized versions of themselves, as friends and rivals, on a road trip to review restaurants in the north of England. But it’s about so much more than that. And it’s hilarious. Check out the trailer below:

And if that’s not enough for you, go to YouTube and check out the clip of Coogan and Brydon’s compete Michael Caine impressions.

Stop-Loss

The Last Starfighter

Vantage Point

To Sir, With Love

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 1

and

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2

Splice

Where The Wild Things Are

Julius Caesar

1953, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

L’Avventura

Under The Mountain

The Town

The Hidden Fortress

1958, directed by Akira Kurosawa

The first Star Wars movie, A New Hope, was based on this film as a primary influence. But beyond that, this is another great film from Kurosawa, and another great release from the Criterion Collection.

Cousins

Synecdoche, New York

2008, directed by Charlie Kaufman. This is a personal favorite of mine, and partly because of that, I can’t say too much about it. It’s not a film for everyone, mostly because it’s a very difficult movie, with a lot of meanings on a lot of levels. Phillip Seymour Hoffman gives the performance of his career as a playwright trying to capture the sadness and infinitely mundane aspects of every day life in a new work that seems to be growing more and more epic (that’s putting it lightly) with each passing moment. I know that’s a very vague plot description, and I apologize. I’ll just put it this way: This is one of the bleakest and most depressing movies I’ve ever seen in my life, but it’s also one of the best films I’ve ever seen, and one of the most uplifting. Check out Roger Ebert’s review and an interview with writer/director Charlie Kaufman.

NON-FICTION:

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall Of Jack Johnson

How Art Made The World

F For Fake

1975, directed by Orson Welles. This is the last major film by Welles, and it’s partially a documentary, focusing on the life of art forger Elmyr de Hory, and partially an essay work, dealing with the ideas of authorship and authenticity, and the value of art. This is a truly enchanting work, and for proof of that, check out the film’s introduction:

Mysteries Of The Garden Of Eden

Secret Origin: The Story Of DC Comics

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Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured DVDs:

02/14/12.

02/07/12.

12/30/11.

Previous New/Featured books:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

Author quotes: Burning books.

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Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. once said, “We must be careful what we pretend to be,”  which is one of my favorite quotes of all time, but Vonnegut was a highly opinionated and prolific author and essayist, and he was always a good source for a good quote or a witty turn of phrase.

The other day I got into a conversation with a few patrons not just about the need for intellectual curiosity in people, especially in this day and age, but the need for constant access to the tools that could inspire and grow that curiosity in these modern times, and it reminded me of something Vonnegut had said a few years before his death (in 2007):

“While on the subject of burning books, I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and destroyed records rather than have to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House, the Supreme Court, the Senate, the House of Representatives, or the media. The America I loved still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.

And still on the subject of books: our daily news sources, newspapers and TV, are now so craven, so unvigilant on behalf of the American people, so uninformative, that only in books do we learn what’s really going on.”

-from A Man Without A Country, his 2005 memoir/essay collection.

You can find an excerpt from the book over at The Guardian, which includes the portion the above text comes from. Much of this book, and in particular this excerpt, are very political with Vonnegut discussing his disappointment in the then-current political climate of the country. Whether you agree with Vonnegut’s politics there or not, you have to admire that there are some nuggets of common sense true for all people, and that he always maintained a strong humanistic outlook on life.

Also, on a side note, in the paragraph preceding the above quote Vonnegut references Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11, his documentary about the September 11 attacks and everything after, and reminds us that the title of the documentary is a reference/parody of Ray Bradbury’s great, classic science fiction novel, Fahrenheit 451. That novel refers to the fact that 451 degrees Fahrenheit is the combustion point, at which paper and the information on it will burn.

The gist of it is this: Not to toot our own horn (too much) but libraries curate and cultivate information, and with information comes intelligence, which is never a bad thing and always in short supply. The library is a resource that you should never let go to waste.

by Eddie Campbell, from here.

Elsewhere on the internet:

Vonnegut’s obituary in The New York Times.

15 things Vonnegut said better than anyone else ever has or will.

Venus On The Half-Shell by Philip José Farmer under the name “Kilgore Trout.”

Vonnegut’s advice for writers.

Vonnegut’s story diagrams.

Harrison Bergeron,” Vonnegut’s classic short story.

An interview with Vonnegut in The Paris Review.

2BR02B,” a 1962 short story that appeared in Vonnegut’s third collection, Bagombo Snuff Box.

The Big Trip Up Yonder,” a short story that appeared in Vonnegut’s first two collections under different names.

The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library in Indianapolis.

Dave Eggers reviews Vonnegut’s first collection of unpublished fiction.

At the library we have quite a few books both by Vonnegut and about his life and work, including When Mortals Sleep, a posthumous release of previously unpublished short fiction by the author, as well as And So It Goes – Kurt Vonnegut: A Life, a new biography of the author by Charles J. Shields, and…

Vonnegut And Hemingway: Writers At War by Lawrence Broer, which draws interesting parallels between these two literary artists, who previously might have been only been coupled together by how vastly different they were. Both were born under the spectre of hereditary insanity, forged in wartime experiences, and used their writing as a means of therapy and survival. And how much more fitting to see them linked, since Hemingway was our quoted author last week? I hope you’ll come and check them out.