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Tag Archives: Creativity

New and Featured Books for 04/26/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Earth Abides by George R. Stewart

Stay Close by Harlan Coben

Loving by Karen Kingsbury

Come Home by Lisa Scottoline

Survivors: A Novel Of The Coming Collapse by James Wesley, Rawles

The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson

Cain by José Saramago

Expats by Chris Pavone

Gypped by Carol Higgins Clark

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

NON-FICTION:

Some Assembly Required: A Journal Of My Son’s First Son by Anne Lamott with Sam Lamott

Me, The Mob, And The Music: One Helluva Ride With Tommy James And The Shondells by Tommy James, with Martin Fitzpatrick

A Family’s Guide To The Military For Dummies by Sheryl Garrett and Sue Hoppin

Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide To Better English In Plain English by Patricia T. O’Conner

Winston’s War: Churchill 1940 – 1945 by Max Hastings

Rin Tin Tin: The Life And The Legend by Susan Orlean

The Man Without A Face: The Unlikely Rise Of Vladimir Putin by Masha Gessen

Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer

Fraternity by Diane Brady

Jobs And The Military Spouse: Married, Mobile, And Motivated For Employment by Janet I. Farley

The Mark Inside: A Perfect Swindle, A Cunning Revenge, And A Small History Of The Big Con by Amy Reading

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

04/19/12.

04/11/12.

04/04/12.

03/29/12.

03/01/12.

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Reading material for 04/09/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet…

RIP Mike Wallace.

RIP Thomas Kinkade.

There are many health hazards lurking in your kitchen.

Men suffer from eating disorders now more than ever.

Is it a bad idea to get an extension on your taxes?

Controversy deepens over pesticides, bee collapse.

Could a nickname get you ahead?

Zombie chocolate bunnies and undead Easter eggs.

Please don’t forget that this is National Library Week! We hope to see you this week, and that you’ll celebrate with us.

Online searches for future linked to economic success.

You can now text instructions to your espresso machine.

How NASA envisioned their exploration of Mars.

Children perceive humanoid robots as emotional, moral beings.

Scientists develop ultra thin solar cells.

What ever happened to the American arcade?

Actor who could never escape their biggest roles.

New horror movie from Joss Whedon is classic horror with a twist.

The creator of The Wire is annoyed with how much you love The Wire.

Gary Ross leaves The Hunger Games franchise.

The documentary Bully has finally received a PG-13 rating.

In defense of podcasts (even if they don’t make money).

The other titles that Stanley Kubrick considered for Dr. Strangelove.

Hitchcock’s Rear Window edited into a single time lapse shot.

The 2012 Hugo Award nominees have been announced.

An interview with Jonah Lehrer about creativity.

Do people with e-book readers actually read more?

10 crazy and unusual book designs.

An archive of book designs and designers, and its blog.

David Foster Wallace writes to Don Delillo.

An interview with Ruth Rendell.

A video interview with William Gibson.

Practical writing advice from C. S. Lewis.

Odd stories behind authors’ nom de plumes.

Edgar Rice Burroughs and John Carter Of Mars.

The mystery of glow in the dark Civil War soldiers.

Take a creepy tour of an abandoned Soviet monument in Bulgaria.

6 Easter traditions you might not know.

There are a lot of cellphones in India and too few toilets.

Liquid body armor.

An important question to ask at the start of your next job interview.

Travel tips from the Harlem Globetrotters.

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Previous online reading material:

04/02/12.

03/26/12.

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 03/06/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Goddess Of Yesterday by Caroline B. Cooney

Gyakushu! vol. 1, written and illustrated by Dan Hipp

Saint Louis Armstrong Beach by Brenda Woods

Historical fiction about how Hurricane Katrina effects an 11 year old boy, dealing with the struggles of evacuation and the strength of a people determined to survive in their city. The review from Kirkus Reviews sums it up nicely: “A small gem that sparkles with hope, resilience and the Crescent City’s unique, jazz-infused spirit.”

Hooked by Catherine Greenman

The River by Gary Paulsen

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

Flawless by Sara Shepard

Fallen by Lauren Kate

Nation by Terry Pratchett

Re-Gifters by Mike Carey and illustrated by Sonny Liew and Marc Hempel

Saving Zoë by Alyson Noël

Angry Management by Chris Crutcher

What They Found: Love On 145th Street by Walter Dean Myers

The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan

An Abundance Of Katherines by John Green

Another novel from author and vlogger, John Green, and his second book. As I’ve said before, Green is extremely popular with our young adult (and adult) readers, and it’s not hard to understand why when you read one of his books. They’re sweet, but they’re quirky and unique, and they’re smart, and the characters are memorable, especially the characters in this book, which is about a boy with an affinity for girls with the name Katherine, and his friend who accompanies him on a road trip. Check out reviews for the novel done by The Young Folks and The New York Times.

My Boyfriend Is A Monster, vol. 1: I Love Him To Pieces by Evonne Tsang and illustrated by Janina Görrissen

Great tagline: “Can love survive the zombie apocalypse?” This is a fun graphic novel. It’s boy meets girl, and of course they come from two different worlds: she’s a jock, and he’s a nerd. And then the zombie outbreak happens. It’s got horror, romance, and the art by Janina Görrissen is just wonderful. Here’s a review from The Ninja Librarian.

NON-FICTION:

Web Design For Teens by Maneesh Sethi

The Brave Escape Of Edith Wharton by Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge

A fine biography of Edith Wharton, author of books like Ethan Frome and The House Of Mirth, who was born into a priveleged, wealthy New York City family during the Gilded Age, and her escape into a more creative life. Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge‘s book is very interesting in that it focuses much more on the life of Wharton, rather than her works, which makes it very insightful for anyone who’s read her books or is looking to discover them. Check out The New York Times‘ review.

Cool Tech: Gadgets, Games, Robots, And The Digital World by Clive Gifford, with consulting by Mike Goldsmith

How Cool Is This? An Up-Close Inside Look At How Things Work

Tattoos And Secret Societies by Jason Porterfield

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone On The Media by Brooke Gladstone and illustrated by Josh Neufeld

Brooke Gladstone is a journalist and media analyst, and an expert on trends in the media, and she hosts NPR’s On The Media. She has called this book, a graphic novel illustrated by cartoonist Josh Neufeld to be a “a treatise on the relationship between us and the news media,” and the story utilizes an illustrated version of Gladstone herself taking the reader through the history of the American press. It is a very interesting book. You can find reviews at Slate and NPR, and an interview with Gladstone at Newsarama. Check out the trailer below:

Wild At Heart: The Story Of Joy Adamson, Author Of Born Free by Anne E. Neimark

Come Back To Afghanistan: A California Teenager’s Story by Said Hyder Akbar

The Big Idea Science Book: The Incredible Concepts That Show How Science Works In The World

Georgia O’Keeffe: The “Widenss And Wonder” Of Her World by Beverly Gherman

Wheels Of Change: How Women Rode The Bicycle To Freedom (With A Few Flat Tires Along The Way) by Sue Macy

Very interesting. Features a brief memoir section of author Sue Macy‘s childhood reminiscences of bicycle riding and then moves into a very informative history of the bicycle and how women were able to use it as innovative technology to cycle out of repressive conditions in the past and closer to independence. There’s also a nice foreword by Leah Missback Day, the founder of World Bicycle Relief. Check out reviews from Booklist and Read Kiddo Read.

Pre-Algebra And Algebra Smarts! by Lucille Caron and Philip M. St. Jacques

Celebrating A Quinceanera: A Latina’s 15th Birthday Celebration by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith and with photographs by Lawrence Migdale

Tricky Mindtrap Puzzles: Challenges The Way You Think & See by Detective Shadow

Raggin’ Jazzin’ Rockin’: A History Of American Musical Instrument Makers by Susan VanHecke

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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And please don’t forget to check back here tomorrow to find out more about our Survey/Trivia contest.

And for info on other future contests we’ll be doing, you can always check out our CONTESTS page.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

Reading material for 02/13/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

SeaWorld is being sued… by five of its “enslaved” killer whales.

Teens learn robotics as factories lack skilled workers.

Origami robots that run only on air.

RIP Whitney Houston.

Listen to Whitney Houston’s isolated vocal track from “How Will I Know?”

Sophisticated jewelry heist stumps Chicago cops.

Take a tour of NYC sewers on Valentine’s Day. Seriously.

California’s volcanoes to be monitored more closely.

34% of people aged 25 to 29 years old have moved back home.

The Pentagon to lift some restrictions on women in combat.

Social media explained.

Amazon tries out the brick and mortar approach.

Google might open a store too.

How to improve your odds in online dating.

The FBI file on Steve Jobs.

The man behind the fake Cormac McCarthy twitter account.

Do you want to open up a perpetual, invisible window into your gmail?

Also, men don’t read online dating profiles.

Stephen Fry says that British judges don’t understand twitter.

Arguing for a Zuckerberg tax.

Mad Men: a guide to catching up before season 5, which starts next month.

Also, Thomas Jane was almost Don Draper.

Natalie Portman to join both of Terrence Malick’s upcoming films.

Naomi Watts to play Princess Diana.

Roger Ebert says 3D is killing Hollywood.

It looks like House will be coming to an end in May with the conclusion of its 8th season.

George Lucas says Han never shot first.

Amy Adams to adapt Steven Martin’s An Object Of Beauty.

Anton Corbijn to adapt John Le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, which will star Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Navy SEALs moonlight as movie stars.

The trailer for The Bourne Legacy.

In the picture above: 15,000 different books about Abraham Lincoln arranged together to form a three story tower in the lobby of the Ford’s Theater Center for Education and Leadership.

What Dr. Seuss books were really about.

William Gibson on aging futurism.

10 of the greatest kisses in literature.

A neurodevelopmental perspective on A. A. Milne.

The top 10 Batman storylines.

Charles Dickens and Sinclair Lewis.

A list of ridiculous names in Charles Dickens novels (incomplete).

Jeffrey Zaslow, the man who wrote the recent Gabrielle Giffords book and the Chesley “Sully” Sullenberg, died on Friday.

Michael Chabon talks about his new short story.

Books that will change the way you think about love.

This is a very cool site: Better Book Titles.

from here.

How black lights work.

Legacy of nuclear drilling site in Colorado still lingers.

Entire genome of extinct human decoded from fossil.

Can bees make tupperware?

10 things you probably didn’t know about love and sex.

Metaphors trigger the visual parts of your brain.

The psychedelic cult that thrived for nearly 2000 years.

Greek protesters setting Athens aflame.

The world’s tallest hotel is, of course, in Dubai.

Why being sleepy and drunk is great for creativity.

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Previous online reading material:

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.