RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Challenges

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 03/06/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Goddess Of Yesterday by Caroline B. Cooney

Gyakushu! vol. 1, written and illustrated by Dan Hipp

Saint Louis Armstrong Beach by Brenda Woods

Historical fiction about how Hurricane Katrina effects an 11 year old boy, dealing with the struggles of evacuation and the strength of a people determined to survive in their city. The review from Kirkus Reviews sums it up nicely: “A small gem that sparkles with hope, resilience and the Crescent City’s unique, jazz-infused spirit.”

Hooked by Catherine Greenman

The River by Gary Paulsen

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

Flawless by Sara Shepard

Fallen by Lauren Kate

Nation by Terry Pratchett

Re-Gifters by Mike Carey and illustrated by Sonny Liew and Marc Hempel

Saving Zoë by Alyson Noël

Angry Management by Chris Crutcher

What They Found: Love On 145th Street by Walter Dean Myers

The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan

An Abundance Of Katherines by John Green

Another novel from author and vlogger, John Green, and his second book. As I’ve said before, Green is extremely popular with our young adult (and adult) readers, and it’s not hard to understand why when you read one of his books. They’re sweet, but they’re quirky and unique, and they’re smart, and the characters are memorable, especially the characters in this book, which is about a boy with an affinity for girls with the name Katherine, and his friend who accompanies him on a road trip. Check out reviews for the novel done by The Young Folks and The New York Times.

My Boyfriend Is A Monster, vol. 1: I Love Him To Pieces by Evonne Tsang and illustrated by Janina Görrissen

Great tagline: “Can love survive the zombie apocalypse?” This is a fun graphic novel. It’s boy meets girl, and of course they come from two different worlds: she’s a jock, and he’s a nerd. And then the zombie outbreak happens. It’s got horror, romance, and the art by Janina Görrissen is just wonderful. Here’s a review from The Ninja Librarian.

NON-FICTION:

Web Design For Teens by Maneesh Sethi

The Brave Escape Of Edith Wharton by Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge

A fine biography of Edith Wharton, author of books like Ethan Frome and The House Of Mirth, who was born into a priveleged, wealthy New York City family during the Gilded Age, and her escape into a more creative life. Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge‘s book is very interesting in that it focuses much more on the life of Wharton, rather than her works, which makes it very insightful for anyone who’s read her books or is looking to discover them. Check out The New York Times‘ review.

Cool Tech: Gadgets, Games, Robots, And The Digital World by Clive Gifford, with consulting by Mike Goldsmith

How Cool Is This? An Up-Close Inside Look At How Things Work

Tattoos And Secret Societies by Jason Porterfield

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone On The Media by Brooke Gladstone and illustrated by Josh Neufeld

Brooke Gladstone is a journalist and media analyst, and an expert on trends in the media, and she hosts NPR’s On The Media. She has called this book, a graphic novel illustrated by cartoonist Josh Neufeld to be a “a treatise on the relationship between us and the news media,” and the story utilizes an illustrated version of Gladstone herself taking the reader through the history of the American press. It is a very interesting book. You can find reviews at Slate and NPR, and an interview with Gladstone at Newsarama. Check out the trailer below:

Wild At Heart: The Story Of Joy Adamson, Author Of Born Free by Anne E. Neimark

Come Back To Afghanistan: A California Teenager’s Story by Said Hyder Akbar

The Big Idea Science Book: The Incredible Concepts That Show How Science Works In The World

Georgia O’Keeffe: The “Widenss And Wonder” Of Her World by Beverly Gherman

Wheels Of Change: How Women Rode The Bicycle To Freedom (With A Few Flat Tires Along The Way) by Sue Macy

Very interesting. Features a brief memoir section of author Sue Macy‘s childhood reminiscences of bicycle riding and then moves into a very informative history of the bicycle and how women were able to use it as innovative technology to cycle out of repressive conditions in the past and closer to independence. There’s also a nice foreword by Leah Missback Day, the founder of World Bicycle Relief. Check out reviews from Booklist and Read Kiddo Read.

Pre-Algebra And Algebra Smarts! by Lucille Caron and Philip M. St. Jacques

Celebrating A Quinceanera: A Latina’s 15th Birthday Celebration by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith and with photographs by Lawrence Migdale

Tricky Mindtrap Puzzles: Challenges The Way You Think & See by Detective Shadow

Raggin’ Jazzin’ Rockin’: A History Of American Musical Instrument Makers by Susan VanHecke

* * *

Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

And please don’t forget to check back here tomorrow to find out more about our Survey/Trivia contest.

And for info on other future contests we’ll be doing, you can always check out our CONTESTS page.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

Advertisements

Reading material for 02/20/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

NASA unveils stunning models of future aircraft designs.

Take a ride in this absolutely terrifying elevator.

Tim Tebow asked to Military Ball by Louisiana airwoman.

The FBI might cut off the internet for millions of people on March 8th.

The image above is by celebrated illustrator Charles Santore.

Brand new Angry Birds game, Angry Birds: Space, to debut in March!

Target is not only extremely good at data mining, but they’re keeping an eye on you.

Man suffers heart attack at Heart Attack Grill!

Supreme Court Justice robbed by machete-wielding intruder.

Catch a glimpse of Google’s luxurious California HQ.

Apple considering a smaller tablet.

Also, Apple’s new operating system aims to knit its products together more closely.

The insidious evils of “Like” culture.

7 horrifying historical origins of famous corporate logos.

The future of high tech healthcare, and its challenges.

Reviewing Pinterest, the newest social media site.

The “Undue Weight” of Truth on Wikipedia.

Does anyone really care about online privacy?

How companies learn your secrets.

On this day in history:

In 1872 the Metropolitan Museum of Art opened in New York city.

In 1933 the 21st Amendment, which will end Prohibition in the United States, is proposed by Congress.

In 1935 Caroline Mikkelson becomes the first woman to set foot on Antarctica.

In 1962, while aboard the Mercury spacecraft entitled Friendship 7, astronaut John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.

In 1998 figure skater Tara Lipinski becomes the youngest individual gold medalist at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

In 2003 there’s an accident with the pyrotechnics display at a White Snake concert in a small club in West Warwick, Rhode Island and 100 people are killed and 200 more are seriously injured.

In 2009 the World Day of Social Justice is officially established and recognized each year. The goal of the World Day of Social Justice is to recognize the need to promote efforts to tackle issues such as poverty, exclusion, and unemployment all over the world.

Famous births: Rihanna in 1988, T. J. Slaughter in 1977, Brent Gretzky (Wayne’s little brother) in 1972, Kurt Cobain in 1967, Cindy Crawford in 1966, Anthony Stewart Head in 1954, Patty Hearst in 1954, Gordon Brown in 1951, Ivana Trump in 1949, Sandy Duncan in 1946, Mike Leigh in 1943, Sidney Poitier in 1927, Richard Matheson in 1926, Robert Altman in 1925, Gloria Vanderbilt in 1924, Ansel Adams in 1902.

Famous deaths: William Wallace Lincoln in 1862, Frederick Douglass in 1895, Max Schreck in 1936, Chester Nimitz in 1966, Dick York (the first Darrin Stephens on Bewitched) in 1992, Ferruccio Lamborghini in 1993, Gene Siskel in 1999, Sandra Dee in 2005, Hunter S. Thompson in 2005.

via Awesome People Reading.

The 20 most beautiful bookstores in the world.

Alan Moore sums up everything that is wrong with the entertainment industry.

A crossover between Doctor Who and Star Trek.

William Gibson and the way we understand cities.

Composite sketches of literary characters.

10 tips on writing from David Ogilvy.

Every Bart Simpson chalkboard quote ever.

Zora Neale Hurston’s love spells and rituals to get a man.

Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby adapted as an opera.

An essential postmodern reading list.

from here.

The cast of Game Of Thrones in normal clothes.

A supercut of television shows referencing other television shows.

Michael Bay will return to direct Transformers 4, which will be a reboot. Seriously.

Get ready for the Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Jon Hamm drops more hints about the new season of Mad Men.

10 things from the Hunger Games books that the movie(s) probably can’t pull off.

Billy Bob Thornton is making a road trip movie about his marriage to Angelina Jolie.

Gael Garcia Bernal is the Zorro of the post-apocalyptic future.

Author Kevin J. Anderson will novelize Rush’s new album.

Crystals may be possible in time as well as space.

Butterflies light the way to better thermal imaging.

The stupid things you do online (and how to fix them).

They know now at what time of day that you’re most likely to get an infection.

The inside story of climate scientists under siege.

Phonemes probably can’t reveal the ancient origins of language after all.

Do you think you could have passed Thomas Edison’s job interview test?

Cats as fonts.

Second graders take a field trip to a parking garage.

How to tie your shoes (Hint: you’ve been doing it wrong for a while now).

* * *

Previous online reading material:

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.