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Reading material for 04/30/12.

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Some reading material from around the internet:

Grant Snider’s The Book Of The Future.

Get ready for the future of Firefox.

Portland tries to ban Groupon.

The dark side of Facebook memes.

The picture above is by Beverly Ealdama, from here.

104 year old woman sets world record as the oldest person to go paragliding (for the second time in five years).

Wal-Mart would like you to pay with cash.

All about CISPA, the bill that wants to erode your online privacy.

How are women’s eyes different from men’s?

from here.

The Choose Your Own Adventure books are now out in digital form.

Ben Marcus, author of The Flame Alphabet, talks about his novel.

The 10 grumpiest living writers.

The New Yorker has figured out what went wrong with the Pulitzers this year.

The Land Of Nod,” an illustrated poem by Robert Louis Stevenson.

John Irving’s advice to aspiring novelists.

The most cryptic titles in literature and what they mean.

Would you read a novel written by the internet?

Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book will become a Disney movie.

The director of Chronicle is going to reboot The Fantastic Four.

Fringe has been renewed for a fifth and final mini season.

Fake Tupac is selling a lot of real records.

The Avengers comes out this Friday in America, but has already made almost $200 million overseas.

Tony Danza and Vince Vaughn are going to make a sitcom together.

The SyFy channel is planning to adapt Stephen King’s The Eyes Of The Dragon.

Movie theater owners still do not want you texting during movies, please.

They’ve already hired writers for the sequel to the new Spider-Man movie.

from here.

The lost civilizations that pioneered skull surgery.

4 people with super memory.

The question of why Rome failed.

How much of the moon’s surface did the Apollo 11 astronauts actually explore?

A brief history of international signage.

The more you struggle with new information the more likely you are to learn it.

Ponder existential depths as you answer the call of nature in this vertigo-inducing floor-less bathroom.

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Previous online reading material:

04/23/12.

04/16/12.

04/09/12.

04/02/12.

03/26/12.

03/12/12.

New and Featured Books for 03/29/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

State Of Wonder by Ann Patchett

The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings

This is the novel that was adapted into the Oscar nominated film (the screenplay adaption won an Oscar) directed by Alexander Payne and starring George Clooney. The movie is very good, and we’d definitely recommend the book to anyone who likes funny and poignant character-driven stories, and who likes to read the book before the movie. Check out a review of the book in The New York Times, and the author’s website.

Paradise by Toni Morrison

Red Inferno: 1945 by Robert Conroy

The Fallen Angels by Bernard Cornwell and Susannah Kells

The Valcourt Heiress by Catherine Coulter

100 Bullets: The Deluxe Edition, Book 1 by Brian Azzarello and illustrated by Eduardo Risso

Like the cover blurb says, Azzarello and Risso’s long running comic book series from DC/Vertigo comics was “one of the greatest works of crime fiction in any medium,” telling some very hard-boiled pulp/noir stories in a very modern way. And this is where it began with it’s very simple initial premise: A mysterious man named Graves would visit people who had been the victim of a serious wrong and present them with evidence of who it was that was responsible for their plight. In the vein of revenge he’d then offer them a handgun and the eponymous 100 bullets, all untraceable by the police. And a lot of very interesting and very dark and very complex stories would spin out of that. Here are reviews of the series at Wired, The Comics Journal, and Pop Matters, and an interview with writer Brian Azzarello at The Onion AV Club.

The Glass Rainbow by James Lee Burke

NON-FICTION:

Women Pilots Of World War II by Jean Hascall Cole

Playing With Trains: A Passion Beyond Scale by Sam Posey

Forged: Writing In The Name Of God – Why The Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are by Bart D. Ehrman

Harriet Tubman: Myth, Memory, And History by Milton C. Sernett

Marie Antoinette by Antonia Fraser

Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell

This is a very fun and informative look at history by journalism, essayist, social commentator, and This American Life contributor Vowell, who looks at America’s imperialist desires and manifest destiny ideals at the end of the 19th century, and which lead to America annexing Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and invading Cuba and the Philippines. Vowell also talks about the culture clash as Christian missionaries swiftly moved in and tried to convert the far more laid back native Hawaiians to the American way of life. Here’s an interview with the author, and you can find interesting reviews of the book at The Los Angeles Times and in The New York Times.

And here’s an odd fun fact for you: Sarah Vowell, seen above, voiced the character Violet in Disney/Pixar’s The Incredibles.

This Is Your Brain On Music: The Science Of A Human Obsession by Daniel J. Levitin

Raw Basics: Incorporating Raw Living Foods Into Your Diet Using Easy And Delicious Recipes by Jenny Ross

The Intimate Lives Of The Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming

The Reading Promise: My Father And The Books We Shared by Alice Ozma

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

Donations.

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This post is really about two things…

The first is: Several of our patrons have come in recently asking if we’ll take donations. The simple answer is:

Yes. Yes, we will. In fact, donations from patrons like you is a big part of how we function.

So if you have any books that you just would like to find a new home for, especially those in the “gently used” category, then please consider us. And the same goes for DVDs, audiobooks, and things like that. We can always use them.

(If you’re looking for tax credit for your donations, especially during this time of year, just let us know.)

But if for some reason we can’t, we have a giveaway shelf where they can go to somebody who can use them.

And that’s part two: We have a giveaway shelf! Someone came in the other day and said to me that it was too bad that we didn’t have a paperback exchange, and I said, “Well… actually, we do!” We have a giveaway shelf where you’re free to come and find some items, and if you’d like to to exchange or just borrow those items, that’s fine too, of course.

And I gotta say, you’ll find some perpetually interesting choices on the giveaway shelf. They’re mostly in the aforementioned “gently used” paperback form, which is perfect for quick reads or if you’re traveling. You’ll find some pictures from several of the paperbacks currently on the shelf in this post, but no promises on how long they’ll be there, or what will take their place.

So please keep us in mind if you’re ever looking to donate some of your books, DVDs, or audiobooks and stop on by to check out our giveaway shelf when you get a chance.

Reading material for 02/27/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

The Artist takes the majority of the big awards at the Oscars.

The weirdest unsolved mysteries of World War II.

RIP Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears.

John Peel’s record collection to be digitized and displayed online.

The myth of 8 hours of sleep.

Academy Awards cupcakes.

Here’s a funny website: Photoshop Disasters.

Unlike humans, chimpanzees don’t enjoy collaborating.

Relive the 1990s in 48 pictures.

from here.

Physicist Brian Cox explains how everything in the universe is connected to everything else.

Stratospheric superbugs offer new source of power.

A pill to help you erase unwanted memories?

Studies show that Mayan civilization’s collapse related to modest rainfall reductions.

High energy workplaces can save America.

Watch TED Talks on Hulu.

This can be your next tweet.

How to remove your Google search history before Google’s new privacy policy takes effect.

A really cool t-shirt with Isaac Asimov on it.

from here.

“Everything I know about love I learned from romance novels.”

J.K. Rowling announces her first novel for adults.

Edward Albee talks about Carson McCullers.

Blink vs. Think: When a movie bewitches a writer.

Check out this NYC phone booth that was turned into a bookshelf/mini library.

Top 10 words that need to be retired from usage immediately.

Is there such a thing as buying too many books?

from here.

A 15 minute long video featuring Worf’s ideas getting shot down by everybody on Star Trek: The Next Generation.

10 science fiction/fantasy endings that we’d like to see more often.

Breaking down the Oscar nominees for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Teddy Roosevelt on The Simpsons.

A video essay on how to pull the perfect movie heist.

Oscar cynicism has become its own special form of Oscar Hype.”

The Best of the Worst Netflix reviews of Best Picture nominees.

Hans Zimmer talks about composing music for The Dark Knight Rises.

from here.

How waiters read your table.

The man with the longest name in the world.

Anatomical diagrams of Japanese monsters.

Foods for healthier teeth.

Dr. Seuss’ birthday is on Friday. Here’s 9 facts you didn’t know about the author.

Explore secret cities.

Photos of people with everything they own.

Speaking of which, apparently easily pronounced names make people more likable.

Make everything OK.

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Previous online reading material:

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

I (Heart) February.

Hey everybody, don’t forget that…

That’s right. February is American Heart Month. Sadly, most of us have known someone who has suffered or died from a heart attack or stroke, so it makes sense that in the same month that you’d especially take the time to love your significant other, that you’d also remember to take care of yourself, and your heart.

That’s why we’re happy to tell you about Million Hearts, an education and prevention program launched last year by the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and whose goal is to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years in this country.

This is a very noble cause and an extremely necessary one, especially considering that 1 in 3 people in the United States have some form of heart disease, which can include severe chest pain, heart attacks, heart failure, and strokes, and that cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in this country, with 1 in 3 deaths resulting from heart attacks or strokes.

Million Hearts also provides some helpful and simple ABCS to keep in mindon a day to day basis or when talking to your doctor:

  • Appropriate Aspirin Therapy for those who need it.
  • Blood Pressure Control.
  • Cholesterol Management.
  • Smoking Cessation.

We really hope you’ll check Million Hearts out, or at least use it as a reminder to make good choices about eating, exercising, heart disease/stroke prevention, or possibly giving up smoking, which is a leading contributor to heart disease.

And please don’t forget that we have some good books and DVDs at the library about taking care of yourself and staying heart healthy, through diet, exercise, and more.

We really hope you’ll come and check them out and take care of yourself.

Reading material for 02/13/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

SeaWorld is being sued… by five of its “enslaved” killer whales.

Teens learn robotics as factories lack skilled workers.

Origami robots that run only on air.

RIP Whitney Houston.

Listen to Whitney Houston’s isolated vocal track from “How Will I Know?”

Sophisticated jewelry heist stumps Chicago cops.

Take a tour of NYC sewers on Valentine’s Day. Seriously.

California’s volcanoes to be monitored more closely.

34% of people aged 25 to 29 years old have moved back home.

The Pentagon to lift some restrictions on women in combat.

Social media explained.

Amazon tries out the brick and mortar approach.

Google might open a store too.

How to improve your odds in online dating.

The FBI file on Steve Jobs.

The man behind the fake Cormac McCarthy twitter account.

Do you want to open up a perpetual, invisible window into your gmail?

Also, men don’t read online dating profiles.

Stephen Fry says that British judges don’t understand twitter.

Arguing for a Zuckerberg tax.

Mad Men: a guide to catching up before season 5, which starts next month.

Also, Thomas Jane was almost Don Draper.

Natalie Portman to join both of Terrence Malick’s upcoming films.

Naomi Watts to play Princess Diana.

Roger Ebert says 3D is killing Hollywood.

It looks like House will be coming to an end in May with the conclusion of its 8th season.

George Lucas says Han never shot first.

Amy Adams to adapt Steven Martin’s An Object Of Beauty.

Anton Corbijn to adapt John Le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, which will star Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Navy SEALs moonlight as movie stars.

The trailer for The Bourne Legacy.

In the picture above: 15,000 different books about Abraham Lincoln arranged together to form a three story tower in the lobby of the Ford’s Theater Center for Education and Leadership.

What Dr. Seuss books were really about.

William Gibson on aging futurism.

10 of the greatest kisses in literature.

A neurodevelopmental perspective on A. A. Milne.

The top 10 Batman storylines.

Charles Dickens and Sinclair Lewis.

A list of ridiculous names in Charles Dickens novels (incomplete).

Jeffrey Zaslow, the man who wrote the recent Gabrielle Giffords book and the Chesley “Sully” Sullenberg, died on Friday.

Michael Chabon talks about his new short story.

Books that will change the way you think about love.

This is a very cool site: Better Book Titles.

from here.

How black lights work.

Legacy of nuclear drilling site in Colorado still lingers.

Entire genome of extinct human decoded from fossil.

Can bees make tupperware?

10 things you probably didn’t know about love and sex.

Metaphors trigger the visual parts of your brain.

The psychedelic cult that thrived for nearly 2000 years.

Greek protesters setting Athens aflame.

The world’s tallest hotel is, of course, in Dubai.

Why being sleepy and drunk is great for creativity.

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Previous online reading material:

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

Reading material for 02/06/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

A brief history of the Super Bowl coin toss.

The history of Fritos.

The science of football.

Football physics: the anatomy of a hit.

NASA releases some new and incredibly beautiful pictures of the Earth.

The best and worst of this year’s Super Bowl ads.

Second teacher at L.A. school accused of “lewd acts” against pupils.

Many singles are looking for love, not marriage.

Where did dragons come from?

via The Art of Google Books.

Some Super Bowl ads were ending up online before the game to create a buzz.

How Apple’s “1984” television ad was almost canceled.

The iphone 5 may be coming out this summer.

You should only pay so much attention to your community.

Tumblr makes itself the news.

Your YouTube activity and your online searches will now be linked, thanks to Google’s new privacy policy.

South Korean man arrested for retweeting North Korea.

Hacker collective Anonymous eavesdropped on an anti-Anonymous strategy phone call between the FBI and Scotland Yard.

Why the clean tech boom went bust.

Are high tech classrooms better classrooms?

Mark Zuckerberg’s manifesto: Why Facebook exists.

Michelle Obama and Nelson Mandela reading together, from here.

Van Gogh found himself at home in nature.

The saddest movie in the world?

Adam Lambert is the new lead singer for Queen.

Jane Levy replaces Lily Collins in the Evil Dead reboot.

DC Comics is going forward with their long threatened prequels of Alan Moore’s Watchmen.

R.I.P. Ben Gazzara.

Loving/hating Philip Glass.

And below, Brian Cox teaches Hamlet to a small child:

Michelangelo writes a letter to his father.

Béla Tarr: Cinema’s ultra dark unknown genius.

An interview with David Cronenberg.

GZA the Genius and David Kaiser.

A new commercial directed by Sophia Coppola.

Soul Train creator/host Don Cornelius found dead of apparent suicide.

Second Mona Lisa may have been painted at the same time as the original.

They’re still trying to make a third Bridget Jones movie.

The stars of Downton Abbey, both on screen and off.

via Awesome People Reading and Retrogasm.

How I learned to stop worrying and write The Marriage Plot,” by Jeffrey Eugenides.

The top 10 books lost to time.

A nice guide to literary tumblrs.

Science fiction futures ruled by the popular kids.

Five essential books on football history.

The seven types of book lovers.

Why are so many literary writers shifting into genre?

Judging books by their covers: The US vs. the UK.

Viggo Mortensen reading Tolkien, from here.

Houston millionaire adopts his girlfriend.

Path is found for the spread of Alzheimer’s.

UNC-Charlotte gets its own SWAT team.

Iran’s giant cardboard cut out of the Ayatollah.

10 famous people who turned down a Knighthood.

Obesity epidemic strikes U.S. pets (too)

How to be the bearer of bad news.

Chicken wing cupcakes.

Isolated Peruvian tribe makes uncomfortable contact.

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Previous online reading material:

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

Reading material.

Posted on

Here’s some reading material from around the internet…

The world’s first mug shots.

6 ridiculous history myths (that you probably think are true).

15 bizarre green inventions.

Did they really discover the Higgs Boson?

Also: 3 things the Higgs Boson can teach you about physics.

TIME magazine’s person of the year: The protestor.

The 100 most popular baby names of 2011.

Are art and architecture converging?

The New York Times on text messaging.

Should copyright be allowed to override free speech rights?

Some complaints about the Kindle Fire.

from here.

Penguin halts e-book sales to libraries.

Speaking of which, check out this blog which reviews one Penguin book a week.

Gift ideas for the book lover who’s read everything.

Anew short story by the author of 1Q84, Haruki Murakami: “Town Of Cats.”

Stereotyping you by your favorite books of 2011.

The most beautiful literary mystery in Edinburgh.

The overlooked sci-fi of 2011.

Some of the year’s best reading for both Adults and Young Adults.

The best e-book and audiobooks of 2011?

A brief guide to fictional languages in literature.

by Daniel Clowes, from here.

Recent passings:

Christopher Hitchens, author and journalist.

George Whitman, owner of Shakespeare & Co.

Steve Jobs, inventor and businessman and pioneer.

Joe Simon, cook book legend and co-creator of Captain America.

Jerry Robinson, comic book legend and creator of Batman villain The Joker.

Joseph M. Chamberlain, pioneer of planetarium shows.

Kim Jong Il, North Korean leader.

Anne McCaffrey, science fiction author.

Betty Ford, former First Lady.

Joe Frazier, boxer and heavyweight champion.

John Barry, conductor and film composer.

Andy Rooney, journalist and commentator.

Peter Falk, actor and TV’s Columbo!

Russell Hoban, author of Riddley Walker.

Rest in peace all.

from here.

The Guardian reviews the David Fincher version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.

The best TV shows of the year and some of the best TV episodes of 2011.

Roger Ebert gives Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol 3 1/2 stars. I’ve seen the movie myself and would agree, it’s definitely worth a viewing. It’s a very fun movie, but if you’re going to see it in the theater then do yourself a favor and see it right: in IMAX. Trust me, it’ll be worth it.

First look at some official images from the new version of The Great Gatsby.

The top 15 “unseen” characters on TV.

The teaser for the upcoming second season of Game Of Thrones. Winter is coming!

The Spielberg Face.

Good news for Agatha Christie fans: The final Hercule Poirot movies starring David Suchet have finally been commissioned.

Speaking of Agatha Christie and mysteries: Did she have Alzheimer’s?

The 26 best movies of 2011?

Watch 1978’s infamous Star Wars Holiday Special in its entirety.

A nice tribute to the movies of this year:

When looking at some of the links listed here, please don’t forget that: We have several of the Hercule Poirot movies on DVD, including the ones starring David Suchet, as well as Murder On The Orient Express which stars Albert Finney and Death On The Nile which stars Peter Ustinov. Also, we have books on knitting and selecting baby names and we have books talking about awesome people. We have Mission: Impossible movies on DVD and we have graphic novels and comic books featuring Batman and his nemesis, the Joker. And of course we have The Dark Knight on DVD, featuring Heath Ledger’s iconic reinvention of the role. We can offer you e-books and audiobooks, we have Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban, and we have several of the James Bond movies on DVD, for which John Barry arranged and composed the memorable theme for.

by Mathieu Belanger, one of the pictures of the year, from here.

More amazing pictures from this year.

Beautiful pictures of Saturn.

4,000 pages of Isaac Newton’s personal notebooks are now available to view online.

An x-ray of a two-headed snake.

Clint Eastwood’s family will star in a reality show.

The 25 most beautiful college libraries in the world.

How knitting behind bars transformed Maryland convicts.

Awesome people hanging out together.

Don’t forget that NORAD will help you track Santa!