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Monthly Archives: March 2012

New and Featured Books for 03/29/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

State Of Wonder by Ann Patchett

The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings

This is the novel that was adapted into the Oscar nominated film (the screenplay adaption won an Oscar) directed by Alexander Payne and starring George Clooney. The movie is very good, and we’d definitely recommend the book to anyone who likes funny and poignant character-driven stories, and who likes to read the book before the movie. Check out a review of the book in The New York Times, and the author’s website.

Paradise by Toni Morrison

Red Inferno: 1945 by Robert Conroy

The Fallen Angels by Bernard Cornwell and Susannah Kells

The Valcourt Heiress by Catherine Coulter

100 Bullets: The Deluxe Edition, Book 1 by Brian Azzarello and illustrated by Eduardo Risso

Like the cover blurb says, Azzarello and Risso’s long running comic book series from DC/Vertigo comics was “one of the greatest works of crime fiction in any medium,” telling some very hard-boiled pulp/noir stories in a very modern way. And this is where it began with it’s very simple initial premise: A mysterious man named Graves would visit people who had been the victim of a serious wrong and present them with evidence of who it was that was responsible for their plight. In the vein of revenge he’d then offer them a handgun and the eponymous 100 bullets, all untraceable by the police. And a lot of very interesting and very dark and very complex stories would spin out of that. Here are reviews of the series at Wired, The Comics Journal, and Pop Matters, and an interview with writer Brian Azzarello at The Onion AV Club.

The Glass Rainbow by James Lee Burke

NON-FICTION:

Women Pilots Of World War II by Jean Hascall Cole

Playing With Trains: A Passion Beyond Scale by Sam Posey

Forged: Writing In The Name Of God – Why The Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are by Bart D. Ehrman

Harriet Tubman: Myth, Memory, And History by Milton C. Sernett

Marie Antoinette by Antonia Fraser

Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell

This is a very fun and informative look at history by journalism, essayist, social commentator, and This American Life contributor Vowell, who looks at America’s imperialist desires and manifest destiny ideals at the end of the 19th century, and which lead to America annexing Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and invading Cuba and the Philippines. Vowell also talks about the culture clash as Christian missionaries swiftly moved in and tried to convert the far more laid back native Hawaiians to the American way of life. Here’s an interview with the author, and you can find interesting reviews of the book at The Los Angeles Times and in The New York Times.

And here’s an odd fun fact for you: Sarah Vowell, seen above, voiced the character Violet in Disney/Pixar’s The Incredibles.

This Is Your Brain On Music: The Science Of A Human Obsession by Daniel J. Levitin

Raw Basics: Incorporating Raw Living Foods Into Your Diet Using Easy And Delicious Recipes by Jenny Ross

The Intimate Lives Of The Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming

The Reading Promise: My Father And The Books We Shared by Alice Ozma

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/27/12.

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

Don’t forget to enter our Trivia/Survey CONTEST.

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We just wanted to remind you…

Don’t forget to enter our Trivia/Survey contest. Saturday is the last day to enter. All you have to do is answer 50 extremely short and fun questions and email us those answers for a prize. What could be easier than that?

We’ve already gotten some very, ah, interesting answers from several patrons. The only thing we’re missing now is yours.

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 03/27/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

A Year In The City by Kathy Henderson and illustrated by Paul Howard

Always In Trouble by Corinne Demas and illustrated by Noah Z. Jones

Families by Ann Morris

Cool Cat by Nonny Hogrogian

Jamaica And The Substitute Teacher by Juanita Havill and illustrated by Anne Sibley O’Brien

My Brother Is Autistic by Jennifer Moore-Mallinos and illustrated by Marta Fabrega

The Bookshop Dog by Cynthia Rylant

Shibumi And The Kitemaker by Mercer Mayer

Betsy Ross by Becky White and illustrated by Megan Lloyd

Told in extreme brevity with some lovely illustrations, this is a nice retelling of the Betsy Ross myth, often rhyming, but with no evidence towards proving the tale. But that’s okay, since that may not be something you really need for the age level this book is aimed towards. All in all, a nice read for younger readers, and possibly a good spark towards conversation about the flag, the beginnings of America, and patriotism. Check out a review of the book over at The Wielded Pen.

FICTION:

Glory Be by Augusta Scattergood

This is a nice bit of historical fiction with a great protagonist. Set during 1964, firmly placed in the battle for civil rights and desegregation and change, the book has been described as “The Help for kids,” but the book really has so much more to offer a younger reader. Definitely recommended. Check out a nice interview with Augusta Scattergood at NPR, and the author’s blog.

Where I Live by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Matt Phelan

Andrew North Blows Up The World by Adam Selzer

The Story Of Mankind by Hendrik Willem Van Loon, and updated by John Merriman

Roland Wright: Future Knight by Tony Davis

NON-FICTION:

The San Francisco Earthquake by John Dudman and illustrated by Richard Scollins

About Penguins: A Guide For Children by Cathryn Sill and illustrated by John Sill

Mary Cassatt by Susan E. Meyer

Baby Mammoth Mummy: Frozen In Time! – A Prehistoric Animal’s Journey Into The 21st Century by Christopher Sloan, with photography by Francis Latreille

The prehistoric world comes into the modern world, or the “Ice Age meets the Technology Age,” as one review put it, this is definitely a good example of a fun and informative non-fiction book for the younger reader. It’s the story of a nicely preserved mammoth, discovered in Siberia 31,000 years after her birth, and the various fields of science, including radiology, palaeontology, and forensic investigation, that have allowed researchers to investigate this find.

Dogku by Andrew Clements and illustrated by Tim Bowers

Women Who Reformed Politics by Isobel V. Morin

Women In The Military by Sandra Carson Stanley

Secrets Of A Civil War Submarine: Solving The Mysteries Of The H. L. Hunley by Sally M. Walker

The Blues Singers: Ten Who Rocked The World by Julius Lester and illustrated by Lisa Cohen

Lucy Maud Montgomery: A Writer’s Life by Elizabeth MacLeod

Crocodiles & Alligators by Seymour Simon

You’re A Grand Old Flag by George M. Cohan and illustrated by Warren Kimble

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/20/12.

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

Reading material for 03/26/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

Amazing new photos of the Titanic.

Starbucks to release their own energy drink.

Rainbow-striped Jello Easter eggs.

Mystery booms in Wisconsin.

Just how big is Wal-Mart?

What you need to know about Mad Men season 5.

A new painting by Van Gogh has been discovered.

A child’s wardrobe that actually leads to Narnia!

from here.

Retina display!

Watch all of Mass Effect 3‘s different endings.

A nice review of Angry Birds Space.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being a meme.

10 things that are smarter than you’d expect.

Historic photos of female scientists at work.

Social media will probably not democratize the world.

Play the interactive 8-bit Mad Men game.

Watch celebrities read their follower’s meanest tweets.

Young people are losing interest in cars.

Suzanne Collins is Kindle’s best selling author of all time, and 29 of the 100 most highlighted passages on the Kindle come from The Hunger Games trilogy.

Speaking of which: the film version of The Hunger Games opens huge.

Defending the thesaurus.

A previously unreleased Kurt Vonnegut novella was released last week.

How does 1Q84 stack up against Haruki Murakami’s other classic novels?

Famous lost novels.

A list of Irish heroes in Jame Joyce’s Ulysses.

Dreamily eerie Alice In Wonderland drawings.

Robert Louis Stevenson on the books that have inspired him.

via Entertainment Weekly.

A nice Game Of Thrones featurette  to get you caught up for the show’s return on April 1.

Some hilarious audience notes from a 1980s screening of David Cronenberg’s Videodrome.

Could Hawkeye from The Avengers be the world’s worst archer?

This is what Carrie looks like in The Sex And The City prequel.

They’re making a Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Meet the new companion on Doctor Who, and learn some details from the upcoming season.

An oral history of The Sopranos.

Many buyers fooled by The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo‘s DVD joke.

The beginning of the end of HBO?

A bizarre picture from a Chinese dog show.

Why cats can survive falls that would kill any other animals.

How does the brain secrete morality?

A brief guide to pop culture in 1966.

10 great songs from 1966.

Chick-Fil-A threatens the guy who made the “Eat More Kale” t-shirts, he fights back with a Kickstarter documentary.

Cell division humor.

Even Geraldo Rivera’s son is ashamed of his father’s comments, re: Trayvon Martin and hoodies.

Pictures of toddlers being best friends with their dogs.

An impossible font.

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Previous online reading material:

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 03/20/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

The Case Of The Peculiar Pink Fan by Nancy Springer

Evil Genius by Catherine Jinks

Grandville by Bryan Talbot

Bone: Tall Tales by Jeff Smith, with Tom Sniegoski

The Monster In Me by Mette Ivie Harrison

Marvel Age Spider-Man: Special Inauguration Day Edition! by Zeb Wells and illustrated by Todd Nauck

The Host by Stephenie Meyer

This book was published a few years ago by this little known author (heavy sarcrasm there), but we just got another copy and figured it’d be interesting to remind our patrons of another work of hers, outside the Twilight saga. I haven’t read the novel myself, but it’s got a very intriguing sounding sci fi plot, and is soon to be adapted into a film starring Saoirse Ronan and Diane Kruger.

The Color Of Fire by Ann Rinaldi

We Need To Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver

A complex novel about the aftermath of a school massacre, written from the perspective of the killer’s mother, who’s trying to understand why and come to terms with the crimes that her son has committed. It was adapted into a highly acclaimed film last year by director Lynne Ramsay and starring cinematic chameleon Tilda Swinton and John C. Reilly. Check out this interview with the author at Salon.

NON-FICTION:

Can Diets By Harmful? edited by Christine Watkins

Escape: The Story Of The Great Houdini by Sid Fleischman

A Lifetime Of Secrets: A PostSecret Book by Frank Warren

Learn How To Speak Dance: A Guide To Creating, Performing, And Promoting Your Moves by Ann-Marie Williams with design and illustrations by Jeff Kulak

Elephant Talk: The Surprising Science Of Elephant Communication by Ann Downer

Conflict Resolution: The Win-Win Situation by Carolyn Casey

Sally Ride And The New Astronauts: Scientists In Space by Karen O’Connor

Making Costumes For School Plays by Joan Peters and Anna Sutcliffe

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

03/06/12.

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

03/13/12.

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

Library hours.

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As always, we want to thank you again for checking out our blog.

Quite a few patrons call us to ask what our hours are, or a lot of the hits that lead internet travelers to this very blog are searches for our hours of operation, and even though you can find it and more about us elsewhere on the blog, or at our FSS page, we just figured that we’d share it with you again…

Our hours of operation are:

Mon. – Thurs. 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Fri. – Sun. Noon – 5 p.m.
Closed on Federal Holidays

We are located at:

620 9th Street
Bldg. 905, Suite 100
Warner Robins, GA 31098

You can contact us either here on our blog, or calling us at:

478-327-8761 (commercial) or 497-8761 (DSN)

Or you can send us an email:

robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com

And don’t forget to check out and enter our Trivia/Survey contest, which goes through the end of March.

We hope that you survived the Ides of March, and have (safe and responsible) fun tomorrow, which is St. Patrick’s Day. Have a good weekend.

New and Featured DVDs for 03/15/12:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Sunset Boulevard

The Trip

2010, directed by Michael Winterbottom. A compilation film from a short British television series featuring comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalized versions of themselves, as friends and rivals, on a road trip to review restaurants in the north of England. But it’s about so much more than that. And it’s hilarious. Check out the trailer below:

And if that’s not enough for you, go to YouTube and check out the clip of Coogan and Brydon’s compete Michael Caine impressions.

Stop-Loss

The Last Starfighter

Vantage Point

To Sir, With Love

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 1

and

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2

Splice

Where The Wild Things Are

Julius Caesar

1953, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

L’Avventura

Under The Mountain

The Town

The Hidden Fortress

1958, directed by Akira Kurosawa

The first Star Wars movie, A New Hope, was based on this film as a primary influence. But beyond that, this is another great film from Kurosawa, and another great release from the Criterion Collection.

Cousins

Synecdoche, New York

2008, directed by Charlie Kaufman. This is a personal favorite of mine, and partly because of that, I can’t say too much about it. It’s not a film for everyone, mostly because it’s a very difficult movie, with a lot of meanings on a lot of levels. Phillip Seymour Hoffman gives the performance of his career as a playwright trying to capture the sadness and infinitely mundane aspects of every day life in a new work that seems to be growing more and more epic (that’s putting it lightly) with each passing moment. I know that’s a very vague plot description, and I apologize. I’ll just put it this way: This is one of the bleakest and most depressing movies I’ve ever seen in my life, but it’s also one of the best films I’ve ever seen, and one of the most uplifting. Check out Roger Ebert’s review and an interview with writer/director Charlie Kaufman.

NON-FICTION:

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall Of Jack Johnson

How Art Made The World

F For Fake

1975, directed by Orson Welles. This is the last major film by Welles, and it’s partially a documentary, focusing on the life of art forger Elmyr de Hory, and partially an essay work, dealing with the ideas of authorship and authenticity, and the value of art. This is a truly enchanting work, and for proof of that, check out the film’s introduction:

Mysteries Of The Garden Of Eden

Secret Origin: The Story Of DC Comics

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Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured DVDs:

02/14/12.

02/07/12.

12/30/11.

Previous New/Featured books:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.