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Monthly Archives: January 2012

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 01/31/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin

Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

A bestselling and critically acclaimed juggernaut for young adult readers, which is especially nice when you consider that it doesn’t involve robots or magic or vampires. I’ve heard from quite a few of our patrons who said that it’s become their favorite book. And it looks like it’ll eventually be adapted into a film starring Selena Gomez.

Paper Towns by John Green

The Disreputable History Of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart

Dreamland by Sarah Dessen

The Odyssey by Gareth Hinds

A graphic novel based on Homer’s epic, classic poem, this book has been very popular since we got it and something I’d definitely recommend to any fans of Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson books.

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

Love Is The Higher Law by David Levithan

Beasts Of Burden: Animal Rites by Evan Dorkin and illustrated by Jill Thompson

Into The Wild Nerd Yonder by Julie Halpern

The Always War by Margaret Peterson Haddix

Girl In Translation by Jean Kwok

Geektastic: Stories From The Nerd Herd by Holly Black

NON-FICTION:

How To Survive Anything by Rachel Buchholz

Just a few of the “anything”s listed on the cover include: Shark attacks, Lightning, embarrassing parents (just as deadly as shark attacks and lightning strikes, to be sure) pop quizzes, “other perilous situations.” Some of those included in the book are mean teachers, hurricanes, lion attacks, avalanches, break ups, and being the new kid. This is a good book to have for just about any situation, it seems.

Sugar Changed The World: A Story Of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, And Science by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos

The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story Of Adventure, Heroism & Treachery by Steve Sheinkin

Revenge Of The Sea: The True Story Of The Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick

Hot X: Algebra Exposed! by Danica McKellar

Stitches: A Memoir by David Small

I’m really happy that we have Stitches, a graphic memoir by acclaimed illustrator David Small. It’s a fascinating and engaging story about the artist’s tormented childhood dealing with a dysfunctional family and chronic disease and eventually the loss of his ability to speak due to a surgical mishap. And after the loss of one voice, he finds another in his ability to draw and tell stories.

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

12/19/11.

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

01/28/12.

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And even more reading material.

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Some reading material from around the internet:

8 actors who look exactly the same on every movie poster.

Science fiction’s predictions for 2012.

Taco Bell has a breakfast menu?

The thrill of blaming others.

Twitter adopts country-specific censorship regime.

Human nature and the neurobiology of conflict.

How old does Google think you are?

Retailers resort to offering refunds to customers for positive reviews online.

There’s a mysterious object at the bottom of the Baltic sea.

Facebook about to go public.

An intimate look at the youth of Egypt in the ongoing revolution.

Polish lawmakers don Guy Fawkes masks to sign ACTA.

Political contributions from the financial sector have increased 700% since 1990.

A bookworm’s guide to casting The Corrections.

The new trailer for Game Of Thrones‘ second season.

The MPAA is “not comfortable” with the internet.

Shirley MacLaine has been cast the Dowager Countess’ nemesis on Downton Abbey.

The best and worst of Sundance 2012.

from here.

J.R.R. Tolkien snubbed by the 1961 Nobel jury.

The wise words of E. B. White.

The 10 most expensive books in the world.

An interview with Michael Ondaatje.

Best practices for Fair Use in libraries.

Literature’s greatest mustaches.

Visionaries from the paperback revolution.

Interesting books coming out in 2012.

Vladimir Putin has some books that he’d like you to read.

The alternate titles of famous books.

Great science fiction authors who never wrote sequels or trilogies.

Language is hardwired to be optimistic, even if people aren’t.

10 of literature’s trippiest books.

from here.

7 things you didn’t know about Joan Of Arc.

Was Leonardo Da Vinci’s famous anatomical chart actually a collaborative effort?

This is what happens when you ask Stephen Hawking for the secret to time travel.

The social networks of the Stone Age.

Volcanoes seen from space.

A truly bizarre headline: “Indonesian man arrested for kicking woman he thought was a ghost.”

How NASA kept astronauts from swearing on the moon.

The world’s giant trees are dying off rapidly.

When did Rome really fall?

An optimistic history of the next 40 years.

Beginning Genealogy.

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On Thursday, Feb. 16 the Library will be hosting a discussion about Beginning Genealogy. We’re calling it “a discussion” rather than a class or seminar because our presenter, Ms. Barbara Schlafer, wants to be prepared to deal with the needs with anyone who comes, be it the person starting off on genealogy as a hobby or the more experienced researcher (for example, if you wanted to join the Daughters of the American Revolution, that requires specific documentation). Our Beginning Genealogy session is free and will help provide you with some of the tools that will enable you to start finding your roots.

The discussion will definitely focus on your individual interests in genealogy and then getting started in gathering your family stories, discovering and utilizing resources that are both physical and on the internet, and how to organize your research. Space could become limited and advanced registration is required.

WHEN: Thursday, February 16, 2012 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM

WHERE: In the Robins Air Force Base Library, Building 905

QUESTIONS/HOW TO REGISTER: If you have any questions or would like to register then please send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and put “Beginning Genealogy” in the subject line. Please register by Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 4 PM. We look forward to hearing from you!

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 01/28/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

Once Upon A Starry Night: A Book Of Constellations by Jacqueline Mitton and illustrated by Christina Balit

At The Supermarket by Anne Rockwell

How The Dinosaur Got To The Museum by Jessie Hartland

Baby Shower by Jane Breskin Zalben

¡Clemente! by Willie Perdomo and illustrated by Bryan Collier

The Fathers Are Coming Home by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Stephen Savage

The description in the book describes this as a “lyrical tribute to all the fathers everywhere who come home to their children—from the rabbit father who hops home to his little bunnies, to the dog father who comes home to his puppies.” This never-before-published book looks like another classic from the author of the classic Goodnight Moon.

FICTION:

The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd

Guinea Dog by Patrick Jennings

Hitty: Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field

A patron came in the other day and mentioned that this was one of her favorite books growing up and was ecstatic to be able to share it with her daughter. It’s the tale of a doll and her adventures as she travels from owner to owner over the course of the century. In 1930 the book was awarded the John Newbery Medal for excellence in American children’s literature.

Football Champ: A Football Genius Novel by Tim Green

A novel about a 12 year old boy who’s hired as a consultant for the Atlanta Falcons because he’s a football genius. Combining a mixture of action, intrigue, and a little bit of insider knowledge from author Tim Green, this is a fun read for young readers, especially boys, whether they like football or not.

The Boy Who Climbed Into The Moon by David Almond and illustrated by Polly Dunbar

Sharp Shot by Jack Higgins with Justin Richards

Taking a break from thrilling adults with his stories, author Jack Higgins delivers an action packed book that plays out like a movie and is a nice choice for young readers, especially boys who might have a hard time finding books that will interest them.

NON-FICTION:

Grilled Pizza Sandwich And Other Vegetarian Recipes by Kristi Johnson

The Groundbreaking, Chance-Taking Life Of George Washington Carver And Science And Invention In America by Cheryl Harness

Ancient Iraq: Archaeology Unlocks The Secrets Of Iraq’s Past by Beth Gruber

Are We Alone? Scientists Search For Life In Space by Gloria Skurzynski

Extreme Weather: Science Tackles Global Warming And Climate Change by Kathleen Simpson

Count On Us: American Women In The Military by Amy Nathan

A very insightful book for young readers about how women have served in every war the United States has fought, even when their contributions weren’t widely acknowledged. It’ll also give the reader a sense of not only how far women have come, but how far military science and medicine has come because of them. The book features a foreword by Walter Cronkite.

Harriet Tubman, Secret Agent: How Daring Slaves And Free Blacks Spied For The Union During The Civil War by Thomas B. Allen

Tsunamis: Witness To Disaster by Judy Fradin and Dennis Fradin

For Good Measure: The Ways We Say How Much, How Far, How Heavy, How Big, How Old by Ken Robbins

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

12/19/11.

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

New and Featured Books for 01/27/2012:

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It’s a brand new year! So come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Chew, vol. 1: Taster’s Choice by John Layman and illustrated by Rob Guillory

Machine Man by Max Barry

Hark! A Vagrant, writen and illustrated by Kate Beaton

If I had only one word to describe this book it would be simply: “Brilliant.” If you allowed me a second word I’d also add: “Fun!” Kate Beaton’s webcomic is one of my favorite spots to check out on the internet and this collection of some of her strips was easily one of my own personal most highly anticipated books of last year. I would highly recommend that you check out this gloriously fun spin of history and literature. For example:

The Hunter by John T. Lescroart

American Fantastic Tales: Terror And The Uncanny From Poe To The Pulps, edited by Peter Straub

and

American Fantastic Tales: Terror And The Uncanny From The 1940s To Now, edited by Peter Straub

This is a very exciting looking two volume set featuring amazing short fiction from authors like Kate Chopin, H. P. Lovecraft, August Derleth, Willa Cather, Truman Capote, Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Stephen King, Michael Chabon, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Ray Bradbury, Vladimir Nabokov, and Edith Wharton, amongst many others. Perfect for the dark and stormy night that any lover of American fiction craves.

The Jaguar by T. Jefferson Parker

Love In A Nutshell by Janet Evanovich and Dorien Kelly

Believing The Lie by Elizabeth George

Faceless Killers by Henning Mankell

NON-FICTION:

Marriage Confidential: The Post-Romantic Age Of Workhorse Wives, Royal Children, Undersexed Spouses & Rebel Couples Who Are Rewriting The Rules by Pamela Haag

I Know Who You Are And I Saw What You Did: Social Networks And The Death Of Privacy by Lori Andrews

Your personal information is violated constantly and the law can’t seem to keep up with the changing demands and capabilities of new technology, all of which makes this a fascinating read about the way our “IRL” selves and our digital selves can be harmed by one another, and usually without us knowing it.

The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View Of The Search For God by Carl Sagan

The Roots Of Modern Conservatism: Dewey, Taft, And The Battle For The Soul Of The Republican Party by Michael Bowen

Ponzi’s Scheme: The True Story Of A Financial Legend by Mitchell Zuckoff

Bottom Of The 33rd: Hope, Redemption, And Baseball’s Longest Game by Dan Barry

The Amazing Story Of Quantum Mechanics: A Math-Free Exploration Of The Science That Made Our World by James Kakalios

A book about something so awesome that’s written for the rest of us. How could you pass this up? Definitely worth a look if the subject interests you but you could do without all that intimidating math nonsense. Plus, it’s got the word “Amazing” in the title and a really cool cover, right?

Kennedy v. Nixon: The Presidential Election Of 1960 by Edmund F. Kallina Jr.

Our Fathers, Ourselves: Daughters, Fathers, And The Changing American Family by Peggy Drexler

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books:

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

12/19/11.

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

12/15/11.

Behind the scenes.

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Our official website is getting closer to completion and I just figured I’d share with you a little behind the scenes photo shoot.