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Monthly Archives: December 2011

A little known author by the name of James Patterson…

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from here.

I went to the movies the other day and one of the many (sigh) commercials that they played before the main feature was a new one featuring author James Patterson hyping the new Kindles. It was kind of funny to me, partly because I don’t really care for the works of Patterson (though our patrons sure do), but then I figured, Hey, it makes sense. The Kindle is probably a major contributor to his massive sales figures, right?

Just out of curiosity, readers and James Patterson fans, What do you think about the new Alex Cross: Tyler Perry?

I know we don’t have any pictures or a trailer yet, just Perry’s previous work, but it’s certainly an interesting choice, right? I like Morgan Freeman in just about anything, so to me he is Alex Cross, even though the role’s a bit of a cipher to me, especially having not read the books, but I preferred the idea of Idris Elba getting the role, who was originally cast in the Rob Cohen-directed version of I, Alex Cross, which is coming out next year sometime. Elba had to drop out of role due to scheduling concerns and Perry was cast. Nice to see Perry showing that he can do more than just the Madea role, and it seems like Patterson has given the actor’s performance his approval. Should be interesting, right?

Anyway, the day after I saw that James Patterson commercial at the movies I went to work and went to empty the library’s book drop as usual…

…only to discover five returned James Patterson books. Patterson checks out quite a bit at our library, but it was funny to see so many of his books return at once. I guess I just had enough free time to ponder whether they were returned by a happy reader or an unhappy one. Either way, if you’re a James Patterson fan, we’ve got a few more of his books on our shelves for you to come check out.

New and Featured Books for 12/19/11:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Mrs. Jeffries And The Mistletoe Mix-Up by Emily Brightwell

While Mortals Sleep: Unpublished Short Fiction by Kurt Vonnegut

The Fifth Woman by Henning Mankell

A Discovery Of Witches by Deborah Harkness

The Unwritten, vol. 1: Tommy Taylor And The Bogus Identity by Mike Carey and illustrated by Peter Gross

The Magician King by Lev Grossman

The Evolution Of Bruno Littlemore by Benjamin Hale

Tricked, written and illustrated by Alex Robinson

NON-FICTION:

In The Womb by Peter Tallack

Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life Of Walter Payton by Jeff Pearlman

America The Vulnerable: Inside The New Threat Matrix Of Digital Espionage, Crime, And Warfare by Joel Brenner

And So It Goes – Kurt Vonnegut: A Life by Charles J. Shields

The New Supply Chain Agenda by Reuben E. Slone

Lost In Shangri-La: A True Story Of Survival, Adventure, And The Most Incredible Rescue Mission Of World War II by Mitchell Zuckoff

A fascinating true story based on the crash of a US military plane called The Gremlin Special. The term “Shangri-La” is the name of a fictional utopia and comes from James Hilton’s Lost Horizon. This book has been listed as amongst the best non-fiction of 2011 by both Salon magazine and The New York Times. We have the American hardcover edition of the book, the cover of which you can see above, but I think I much prefer the British edition’s cover:

Margaret Mitchell, Reporter, edited by Patrick Allen

Clark Howard’s Living Large In Lean Times: 250+ Ways To Buy Smarter, Spend Smarter, and Save Money by Clark Howard

Colossus: Hoover Dam And The Making Of The American Century by Michael Hiltzik

Black Power In Dixie: A Political History Of African Americans In Atlanta by Alton Hornsby Jr.

Dreaming Of Dixie: How The South Was Created In American Popular Culture by Karen L. Cox

You can watch an interview with the author here, via BookTV.

How I Got This Way by Regis Philbin

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books:

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

12/15/11.

Reading material.

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Here’s some reading material from around the internet…

The world’s first mug shots.

6 ridiculous history myths (that you probably think are true).

15 bizarre green inventions.

Did they really discover the Higgs Boson?

Also: 3 things the Higgs Boson can teach you about physics.

TIME magazine’s person of the year: The protestor.

The 100 most popular baby names of 2011.

Are art and architecture converging?

The New York Times on text messaging.

Should copyright be allowed to override free speech rights?

Some complaints about the Kindle Fire.

from here.

Penguin halts e-book sales to libraries.

Speaking of which, check out this blog which reviews one Penguin book a week.

Gift ideas for the book lover who’s read everything.

Anew short story by the author of 1Q84, Haruki Murakami: “Town Of Cats.”

Stereotyping you by your favorite books of 2011.

The most beautiful literary mystery in Edinburgh.

The overlooked sci-fi of 2011.

Some of the year’s best reading for both Adults and Young Adults.

The best e-book and audiobooks of 2011?

A brief guide to fictional languages in literature.

by Daniel Clowes, from here.

Recent passings:

Christopher Hitchens, author and journalist.

George Whitman, owner of Shakespeare & Co.

Steve Jobs, inventor and businessman and pioneer.

Joe Simon, cook book legend and co-creator of Captain America.

Jerry Robinson, comic book legend and creator of Batman villain The Joker.

Joseph M. Chamberlain, pioneer of planetarium shows.

Kim Jong Il, North Korean leader.

Anne McCaffrey, science fiction author.

Betty Ford, former First Lady.

Joe Frazier, boxer and heavyweight champion.

John Barry, conductor and film composer.

Andy Rooney, journalist and commentator.

Peter Falk, actor and TV’s Columbo!

Russell Hoban, author of Riddley Walker.

Rest in peace all.

from here.

The Guardian reviews the David Fincher version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.

The best TV shows of the year and some of the best TV episodes of 2011.

Roger Ebert gives Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol 3 1/2 stars. I’ve seen the movie myself and would agree, it’s definitely worth a viewing. It’s a very fun movie, but if you’re going to see it in the theater then do yourself a favor and see it right: in IMAX. Trust me, it’ll be worth it.

First look at some official images from the new version of The Great Gatsby.

The top 15 “unseen” characters on TV.

The teaser for the upcoming second season of Game Of Thrones. Winter is coming!

The Spielberg Face.

Good news for Agatha Christie fans: The final Hercule Poirot movies starring David Suchet have finally been commissioned.

Speaking of Agatha Christie and mysteries: Did she have Alzheimer’s?

The 26 best movies of 2011?

Watch 1978’s infamous Star Wars Holiday Special in its entirety.

A nice tribute to the movies of this year:

When looking at some of the links listed here, please don’t forget that: We have several of the Hercule Poirot movies on DVD, including the ones starring David Suchet, as well as Murder On The Orient Express which stars Albert Finney and Death On The Nile which stars Peter Ustinov. Also, we have books on knitting and selecting baby names and we have books talking about awesome people. We have Mission: Impossible movies on DVD and we have graphic novels and comic books featuring Batman and his nemesis, the Joker. And of course we have The Dark Knight on DVD, featuring Heath Ledger’s iconic reinvention of the role. We can offer you e-books and audiobooks, we have Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban, and we have several of the James Bond movies on DVD, for which John Barry arranged and composed the memorable theme for.

by Mathieu Belanger, one of the pictures of the year, from here.

More amazing pictures from this year.

Beautiful pictures of Saturn.

4,000 pages of Isaac Newton’s personal notebooks are now available to view online.

An x-ray of a two-headed snake.

Clint Eastwood’s family will star in a reality show.

The 25 most beautiful college libraries in the world.

How knitting behind bars transformed Maryland convicts.

Awesome people hanging out together.

Don’t forget that NORAD will help you track Santa!

New and Featured Books: Lisbeth Salander.

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The American film version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, based on Stieg Larsson’s Lisbeth Salander/Millennium novels, is due to be released this Tuesday, December 20, and it’s easily one of the most anticipated movies of this year, let alone this holiday season. The film, directed by David Fincher, and starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, has a lot of hype and good buzz surrounding it, as well as a lot to live up as far as expectations.

The novels by Larsson have been among our most requested items this past year (and the year before), but I wanted to remind you as well that we also have the novels in audio format and that we also have the two original Swedish film adaptations of the books, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and The Girl Who Played With Fire. To me, the first of the Swedish movies is okay, but just okay, and the second one, The Girl Who Played With Fire, is somewhat less than “just okay,” but for a lot of us, they’ve been decent holdovers while we waited for the new film version of the story.

Normally I wouldn’t hype the remake of a film, but I will happily make an exception here just because I didn’t think the original Swedish movie was a good adaptation at all, let alone a particularly great movie. I’d actually say that just the trailer that you see above for Fincher’s film was more successful on both counts than the original movie version. But maybe I’m biased in that I really like David Fincher’s work, as well as Daniel Craig, wwhom I didn’t use to like, but who won me over with his portrayal of James Bond and some of the other films he’s done in the past few years.

And Rooney Mara (who was in Fincher’s The Social Network as well as the remake of Nightmare On Elm Street) looks extremely promising in the very unique role of hacker heroine Lisbeth Salander.

Interesting side note: The stars of the original Swedish movies, Michael Nyqvist and Noomi Rapace, both have movies out this week as well. Rapace is in Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows (and will appear in Ridley Scott’s upcoming Alien pseudo-prequel Prometheus) and Nyqvist is the villain in Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol.

Larsson’s novels are hardly high art but if you haven’t read them yet, now is a good time to start for a good mystery/thrill ride.

And if you get a chance to see it, let us know what you think of the new movie.

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

Holiday hours.

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from here.

Our hours are going to be slightly different between now and the end of the year. These are our hours during the holiday season:

Friday, 12/16 thru Sunday, 12/18: 12 PM noon to 5 PM

Monday, 12/19 thru Thursday, 12/22: 10 AM to 5 PM

Friday, 12/23 thru Monday, 12/26: CLOSED

Tuesday, 12/27 thru Thursday, 12/29: 10 AM to 5 PM

Friday, 12/30: 12 Pm noon to 5 PM

Saturday, 12/31 thru Monday, January 2, 2012: CLOSED

And we will reopen on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012 at 10 AM and resume our normal hours of operation.

New and Featured Books for 12/16/11:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

The Affair by Lee Child

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Bonnie by Iris Johansen

The Man Who Smiled by Henning Mankell

Damned by Chuck Palahniuk.

A very unique homage to the works of Judy Blume. Here is the publisher’s official synopsis for the new book from the extremely popular cult author and here are reviews from The Washington Post and Gentlemen’s Quarterly. And an interview with Palahniuk in The Wall Street Journal.

The Best Of Me by Nicholas Sparks

How To Live Safely In A Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu.

Selected Novels And Short Stories by Patricia Highsmith

1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

I personally could not be more excited to have this book at our library. One of my favorite authors. Check out the review from The New York Review Of Books and in The New York Times. Picked by Amazon as the #2 (of 10) book of the year. We think you’ll find that this book is proof that literature matters.

Zone One by Colson Whitehead

NON-FICTION:

Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard

Death In The City Of Light: The Serial Killer Of Nazi-Occupied Paris by David King

A Savage Conflict: The Decisive Role Of Guerrillas In The American Civil War by Daniel E. Sutherland

Dear Cary: My Life With Cary Grant by Dyan Cannon

Ghost In The Wires: My Adventures As The World’s Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick with William L. Simon

Our Overweight Children: What Parents, Schools, And Communities Can Do To Control The Fatness Epidemic by Sharron Dalton

My Song: A Memoir by Harry Belafonte with Michael Shnayerson

Last Call: The Rise And Fall Of Prohibition by Daniel Okrent

Should be a very interesting book and also seems to be the basis for the new Ken Burns documentary.

When A Billion Chinese Jump: How China Will Save Mankind – Or Destroy It by Jonathan Watts

Digging: The Afro-American Soul Of American Classical Music by Amiri Baraka

Nothing Bad Happens To Good Girls: Fear Of Crime In Women’s Lives by Esther Madriz

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

The Starry Night.

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If you’ve got a few minutes to kill and you’re in our area, stop on by and help us with our puzzle. We set this out as a collaborative project for our library patrons and we’re enjoying working on it so far, but we’d enjoy it more if you’d join us.

We’ve been wanting to put a puzzle out for a while now, something for us all to do a little bit of at a time, something that would be both rewarding and challenging…

So with that in mind we figured: Why not start with the best? So here we have The Starry Night, 1889, by post-impressionist master, Vincent Van Gogh.

You can find out more about Van Gogh through both Wikipedia and Artble and the Museum Of Modern Art, and find a gallery of his work here. And here you’ll find analysis on The Starry Night, as well as at the Musée d’Orsay.

Here’s what the puzzle is supposed to look like:

So come and help us finish it?